New Zealand Headdress & Collar Badges


The ‘E’ Squadron – (an entirely New Zealand Squadron) headdress and collar badges depict a fern-leaf inscribed with the letters NZ.  In brass (KK 1377).

The silver fern headdress badge first appears in photographs of the Kings’ Colonials at their annual camp in St. Albans in the summer of 1904. In 1903 an attempt to create an entirely New Zealand ‘E’ Squadron proved unsuccessful due to insufficient numbers of New Zealanders being recruited. By the summer of 1904, the New Zealanders constituted the 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African).

The ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) headdress badge is shown being worn in Figure 250.

Figure 250: Close-up image of the ‘E’ (New Zealand) Squadron and later 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge (KK 1377) and matching collar badges being worn from the group photograph shown in Figure 215. 

Figure 251 shows a genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) Officer's headdress badge in gilt. The headdress badge is die struck and has prominent full stops after the letters N and Z and the veins on the silver fern leaf are sharp and crisp. The east-west positioned loops are an old replacement with pairs of wire loops.

Figure 251: A genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) and later 3rd (New Zealand) Troop, ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Officer's gilt headdress badge (KK 1377) with an old replacement of the loops with pairs of wire loops. 
 
Figure 252 shows a genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) Officer's headdress badge in gilt and matching pair of collar badges in gilding metal. The headdress badge is die struck and has prominent full stops after the letters N and Z and the veins on the silver fern leaf are sharp and crisp. The copper loops are positioned east-west and are lacking feet.

Figure 252: A genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) and later 3rd (New Zealand) Troop, ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Officer's gilt headdress badge (KK 1377) with a matching pair of collar badges. 

The 3rd Troop (New Zealand), ‘D’ Squadron collar badges were worn as a facing pair with the tips facing outwards. The pair of collar badges shown in Figures 251-252 are die-struck in gilding metal and have copper loops positioned east-west.