Sweetheart Badges - Regimental


King’s Colonials sweetheart badges are commonly brooched versions of their collar badges. The first example of these is shown in Figures 295 which is a brooched (north-south) version of a die-struck, second pattern Regimental collar badge (as per Figures 265-266). There are also similar versions of the flat backed, die cast, Officer's second pattern Regimental collar badge worn with an east-west brooch fitting as a sweetheart badge.  Another example, the rear of which is shown in Figure 297 is a brooched 'A' Squadron (British Asian) collar badge.

Figure 295: Rear image of a brooched version of a die-struck, second pattern Regimental collar badge worn as a Regimental sweetheart badge. 

Another type of sweetheart badge is in the form of a cravat pin (Figure 296) similarly fashioned from a flat-backed, die-cast, Officer’s second pattern Regimental collar badge (Figures 263-264). This is the second of these cravat pins that I have seen and this may not be surprising as cravat pins were popular items of an Edwardian gentleman’s attire. These are not converted collars as there are no stumps from loops having been once attached but were made as sweetheart badges from the casting moulds of the collar badges.

Figure 296: Composite image of the front and rear of a King’s Colonial cravat pin fashioned from a flat-backed, die-cast, Officer’s second pattern Regimental collar badge. 


Figure 297: Rear image of a brooched version of a die-struck ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badge worn as a Regimental sweetheart badge.