The History, Uniforms and Badges of The King's Colonials, King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse


A guide to determining genuine badges

Introduction


Introduction Introduction Introduction
The King’s Colonials were a unique yeomanry Regiment in the British Army in the opening years of the 20th century. They were comprised of Colonial volunteer’s resident in Britain initially from those living in London but in time extending to Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool.  A combination of colourful characters, rich and flamboyant uniforms, iconic badges reflecting proud Dominion heritages mixed with Royal patronage ensured that the King’s Colonials became a much talked about Regiment.  The King’s Colonials bore many distinctions and among them that they were the only Colonial unit administered from Whitehall and the other rather tragically is that although not the very last but among those officially registered as having being killed on Armistice Day was a Trooper of 'C' Squadron King Edward's Horse.  

Re-named in 1910 as the King Edward’s Horse (King’s Overseas Dominions Regiment) the Regiment went on to see active service in the Great War. Service in the King Edward's Horse proved to be a highly-regarded training ground for future Officers. Some 550 men were transferred from the King Edward’s Horse to become Officers in other units. The King Edward's Horse were demobilised upon their return to England in 1919 and were never re-embodied being disbanded in 1924.

Much of the time in the Great War, the King Edward’s Horse were kept in reserve waiting for breakthroughs in the line which rarely if ever occurred. They spent much of their time foraging for themselves and their horses and delivering messages. The infantry took their abbreviated title of ‘KEH KODR’ and jeeringly called them ‘King’s Own Despatch Riders’.

The truth is that the King Edward’s Horse had an exemplary wartime service record. During the war the Regiment lost ten Officers, two Staff Sergeants and 69 Other Ranks killed or died on service. They were awarded four Distinguished Service Orders, one with bar; eleven Military Crosses, one with bar; ten Distinguished Conduct Medals, one with bar; five Meritorious Service Medals and twenty-five Military Medals plus a number of Foreign service awards and Mentioned in Dispatches.

The King’s Colonials and later the King Edward’s Horse together, with nothing more than a namesake as a link, the 2nd King Edward’s Horse represent a tremendous topic for research.  The badges of these Regiments in particular make a fascinating study.  This was my initial interest in the Regiments which grew over time to a fuller appreciation of their uniform and place in history.  

My next project is to build up a comprehensive Medal Roll with entitlements and memorials to the fallen.

I hope you find some aspects of this website to be of interest and use and I would very much like to hear from you should you have questions, comments, corrections or information to contribute.  I certainly do not profess to being an expert on this subject.  

To descendants of members of the Regiments I hope you can be proud of such a heritage.  

Lest We Forget.




Acknowledgements


There are many myths, mis-truths and misunderstandings regarding the history, uniforms and badges of the King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and 2nd King Edward’s Horse. Their headdress badges have been heavily copied and I have set out to try and advise the reader as to how best to distinguish an original headdress badge from a copy.  In attempting to do so I have purposely chosen not to disclose certain characteristics and images of badges which I believe would help copiers of badges "improve their game".  

As this website is intended for research purposes only I have included several images from websites where I have been unable to make contact with the owner and apologise in advance should the owner not wish the image to be used.  I would hope to hear from them and seek their permission to support this project.  All images without a specific attribution are from my own collection.

The hyperlinks are embedded in the text in blue to allow the original source and additional information to be accessed.

The set of King's Colonials badges I have shown here is the only full set I have seen to date of all of the Regimental and Squadron headdress and collar badges with shoulder titles and tunic button. The Australian collar badges were on loan for the photograph but I now have added a pair to my own collection.

Contemporary photographs provide a unique insight into the uniforms and badges of the King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and 2nd King Edward’s Horse and the manner in which they were worn.   A friend and major collaborator on this project whom I met on the Great War Forum, Darren O’Brien was very fortunate to have acquired a collection of photographs with annotations of the King’s Colonials by R. J. (Bob) Smith who made a detailed study of many of the British yeomanry regiments.  The access to these photographs and notes was a turning point in being able to more critically detail the uniform and badges of the King's Colonials and King Edward's Horse.  This material was supplemented through the purchase of a photograph album of the King’s Colonials on annual camp in the period 1902-04. I am indebted to Simon Jervis for sourcing this album.

I am deeply grateful to several friends and acquaintances who have generously provided copies of photographs, measurements and notes on the badges and uniforms of the King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and 2nd King Edward’s Horse.  My thanks to an unnamed Sydney collector, Ian Barker, Gardner Bell, Mike Bekkett, Pat Birley, John Burridge, Timothy Connolly, Steve Bosley, Iain Davidson, Michael T. Finchen, Rod Flood, Phil Garland, Simon Jervis, Rob Miller, Jon Mills, Griff Morgan-Jones, Geoff Newman, David Oldham, Laurie Osborne, Alex Rice, Paul Spellman, James Stevenson, David Stewart, Pierre Vandervelden and Garry White.  Many of these friends I have met through the British & Commonwealth Military Badge Forum which is an invaluable resource for any badge collector.  

Peter Nemaric deserves special thanks for sharing several excellent photographs of the King’s Colonials and King Edwards Horse. Peter created and manages the King Edward’s Horse website and I am deeply indebted to him for allowing them to be used.

I would also like to thank Carole McEntee-Taylor for her permission to use the photographs of Sydney Harris from her excellent biography of this remarkable man (From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer: The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris. London: Pen and Sword, 2015).

Since this website went live an article by Keith Hook and David Knight entitled ‘The Badges, Titles and Buttons of King Edward’s Horse’ was published in the Journal of the Military Historical Society. 251:70-78, 2018. This contains a number of additional pieces of information regarding the badges and uniforms of the King's Colonials and King Edward's Horse which I now reference on my site. I am appreciative of their efforts to document their research and for correspondence with Keith regarding their badges.

My heartfelt thanks go to my brother Stephen for his extensive and patient proof-reading, and encouragement.

The badge photography was a considerable challenge and would like to especially thank my father-in-law Michael for all his experimentation and technical tuition to overcome this.

I was encouraged to write this article by my close friend and mentor John Longstaff who has sought to teach me much about the badges of the British Empire. The learning continue and I sincerely thank John for his edits, guidance and friendship.

There is no doubt in my mind that this project would have been accomplished without the guidance and practical support of Ivan Machin.  Having read Ivan’s tremendous book on the ‘Badges of the York and Lancaster Regiment’ I eagerly contacted him to seek his guidance on how to go about tackling the compilation of my notes and assemblage of photographs into something concrete that I could share with others.  Ivan has been generous with his time in supporting me on this journey and has openly shared with me his own experience of converting to a website so that fresh additions to a collection can be accommodated.

I am indebted to the love and support of Anna my wife and three wonderful children Cameron, Elisabeth and Alexander for their infinite patience and tolerance for their Father’s fascination with badges and their history.
Acknowledgements

Dedication


Dedication Dedication Dedication
This project is dedicated to the memory of the proud military service of my Father, Kenneth Moss (Corporal, Royal Lincolnshire Regiment) and his brothers Alan (Private, King’s Royal Rifle Corps and Parachute Regiment), Wallace (Aircraftsman, Royal Air Force) and Gordon (Craftsman, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Died as a Prisoner of War of the Japanese in 1945); my Grandfather Charles Herbert Moss (Sergeant, ‘C’ Company, 18th Lord Durham Pals Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, wounded at Ypres and on the Somme) and my maternal great Grandfather Harry Morley (Private, 2nd Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment,  Died of Wounds 21st May 1915, Battle of Festubert) and his brother John (Private, ‘A’ Company, 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, Died of Wounds 22nd November 1914, Battle of the River Aisne).

Lest We Forget the service and sacrifice of the men of the King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and the 2nd King Edward’s Horse.

King's Colonials Formation


King's Colonials Formation King's Colonials Formation
The Second Boer War had proven a very difficult political and military campaign for Great Britain to positively conclude.  By 1900 the combination of the vastness of the South African veld and the ravages of disease and hard soldiering for men and horses meant that more men were required to be released from home service units to fight overseas.  Patriotic fervour was running high across the British Empire and many citizens from the British Colonies had enlisted to serve in Lord Roberts, Commander in Chief’s army in South Africa.  As Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James DSO describes in his history of the unit (The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921), George Hamilton (Figure 1, top image), a solicitor and a member of the Committee of the Colonial Club in London, suggested that there should be a home defence yeomanry unit, raised purely from overseas volunteers’ resident in England.

Figure 1, top image:  Lieutenant Colonel George Hamilton who first conceived of the formation of the King’s Colonials in the Officer’s Service Dress uniform of King Edward’s Horse, circa 1910-12.  He joined the King’s Colonials upon its formation in 1901 and although having retired in 1912, he served extra-regimentally during the Great War (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).

Together with fellow Committee member, Lieutenant Colonel Nesbit Willoughby Wallace (Figure 2, bottom image), late of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, they sought endorsement of the proposal from all the colonial representatives in London of the senior members of the Empire: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and India.  Although supportive, the New Zealand Agent General had doubts that there were sufficient numbers of New Zealanders living in England to enlist.

Figure 2, bottom image:  Lieutenant Colonel Nesbitt Willoughby-Wallace, first Commanding Officer of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry 1901-04 (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921). 

Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Wallace (20 April 1839 – 31 July 1931) was born in Canada, was a first class cricketer but is perhaps best remembered for his co-design of the Slade Wallace leather 1888 Pattern valise equipment.  He was 75 at the outbreak of the Great War but remained active in recruiting for the King Edward's Horse.  His name is listed against the rank of Honourary Lieutenant Colonel in the July 1915 Army List.

Some seventy men came forward as being willing volunteers when a recruiting advertisement was run in the London papers in the summer of 1900.  Having gained the approval of Lord Roberts, the 4th County of London Imperial Yeomanry (King’s Colonials) was formed on the 29th November 1901 at Charing Cross, London. The Regiment was 50th in precedence within the yeomanry.  The Lord Lieutenant of the County of London, Lord Fife become Colonel in Chief and His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall and York, K.G. (later King George V) became the Regiment’s Honorary Colonel in December 1901.  King George was the first Officer gazetted to the Regiment and his enthusiastic support saw the unit fulfill numerous ceremonial duties as a highly-popular overseas Dominion unit raised in the County of London.  The King’s Colonials have the distinction of being the only Colonial unit administered from Whitehall.


King's Colonials 1902-05


The first recruit sworn into the King's Colonials was Henry S. Cubitt who was curiously given 32 as his Regimental Number on 4th January 1902.  The first muster of the Regiment was held on 11th February 1902.

Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Wallace became the first Commanding Officer and Captain Robert Roland Thompson (late of the Australian Horse) was appointed Adjutant; Captain Sir Robert Bailie (Australia) and Mr John Howard (Canada) were appointed as Captains; and George Hamilton (South Africa and Chile) and A. G. Berry (Australia) as Lieutenants (Figure 3).   Volunteers came from the upper echelons of society from Colonial outposts and funding came from the Dominion Government’s that sponsored their own particular Squadrons.  A cavalry or yeomanry Squadron is the equivalent of a company in an infantry Regiment and was comprised of about 120-150 Officers and Other Ranks.  A cavalry or yeomanry Regiment would generally be made up of four Squadrons.

Figure 3:  The Officers of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry from left to right, back row: Lieutenant Lionel James, Captain J. Howard, Lieutenant P. Hare and Surgeon-Lieutenant L. J. H Oldmeadow, MD.  Second row: Second Lieutenant H. C. Corlette, Colonel Sir E. W. D. Ward (K.C.H Under-Secretary of State for War), Lieutenant G. Hamilton, Captain Sir Robert Baillie, Bart., Lieutenant A. G. Berry, Second Lieutenant W. J. Ratcliffe, Lieutenant Hamar Greenwood, and Lieutenant G. Seymour Fort. Front row: Major J. M. Vereker, Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Wallace, and Captain and Adjutant Robert Roland Thompson in Undress uniform circa 1902 (Navy and Army Illustrated. London: Elliot & Fry, Volume XIV: Number 274, 147-148, May 3rd 1902). Lieutenant later Sir Hamar Greenwood was born in Canada in 1870 and notably served as the last Chief Secretary of Ireland between 1920 and 1922.  He died a Viscount in 1948 and a close-up photograph of him is shown in Figure 156.

The King’s Colonials established their Headquarters at 30 Charing Cross Road and drilled in a hall at 304 King’s Road in Chelsea (Figure 4).  By April 1902, the Regimental strength was 190 and a Regimental band had been formed.  A representative Squadron was present at King Edward’s Coronation Review on 12th June 1902 and a Lieutenant George Hamilton, one NCO and eight Troopers attended the King Edward VII’s coronation on 9th August 1902.

Figure 4:  His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and Officers of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry (Full Dress uniform) at the Inspection and Official Opening of the Drill Hall in the King’s Road, Chelsea on 6th May 1902 (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).   

In 1903 it was proposed that the Regiment initially form "Colonial" Squadrons to represent each of the overseas Dominions:

  • ‘A’ Squadron - British Asians (mostly Indian)
  • ‘B’ Squadron - British Americans (actually Canadians)
  • ‘C’ Squadron - Australasian (Australian & New Zealanders
  • ‘D’ Squadron - British African (South African & Rhodesian)
  • ‘E’ Squadron – attempts were made to form an entirely New Zealand Squadron but was unsuccessful.  The New Zealanders became the 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (South African) and this left ‘C’ Squadron as wholly Australian in make-up and so ‘C’ Squadron was re-named the Australian Squadron.  
The same year, the Regiment commenced training at Latimer Park with a strength of 18 Officers and 202 Other Ranks.

It was again divided into four Squadrons with three Troops per Squadron:

  • ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) commanded by Captain L. James with 1st Troop (Asian) 2nd Lieutenant Stockwell, 2nd Troop (Asian) 2nd Lieutenant Radcliffe and 3rd Troop (Australian) Lieutenant Corlette. 
  • ‘B’ Squadron (Canadian) commanded by Major J. Howard with 1st Troop (Canadian) Lieutenant Hamar Greenwood, the 2nd Troop (Canadian) Captain G. Hamilton and the 3rd Troop (Australian).
  • ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) commanded by Major Sir Robert Baillie, Bart with 1st Troop (New South Wales) 2nd Lieutenant J. Armstrong, 2nd Troop (New South Wales) Lieutenant G. S. Fort and 3rd Troop (Victoria) Captain A. G. Berry.
  • ‘D’ Squadron (South African) commanded by Major J. M. Vereker with 1st Troop (African) -, 2nd Troop (African) Lieutenant P.  R. Hare and 3rd Troop (New Zealand) Captain R. S. Vaile. 
The King’s Colonials purchased a Pegasus car for conveying their Officer’s for inspection duties in 1902 and were a fully independent unit with their own battery of machine guns (see Annual Camps section), a corps of signallers and an ambulance corps.

Upon retirement of Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Wallace on the 19 April 1904, command of the Regiment passed to Lieutenant Colonel Honourable Herbert Alexander Lawrence, late of the 17th Lancers (Figure 4a).  Colonel Lawrence was the son of Lord Lawrence, Viceroy of India. The Regimental Headquarters moved to Gloucester Terrace, London.  The early years of the King's Colonials were not without difficulties as the Regiment was short of funds for many years.  The assumption had been made that wealthy Colonials and Dominion Governments would financially support the newly formed Regiment but the reality was quite different.  

Figure 4a: Portrait of Lieutenant Colonel Honourable Sir Herbert Alexander Lawrence, National Portrait Gallery

On the 7th April 1905, the Regimental title was shortened to the simpler "King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry”.  The Regiment thanks to Royal patronage and colourful uniforms provided a Guard of Honour for numerous overseas dignitaries.

King's Colonials 1906-09


King's Colonials 1906-09 King's Colonials 1906-09
By 1906, recruitment had stalled and so the catchment for volunteers was expanded with subsequent addition of detachments in Cambridge and Oxford plus a Liverpool Troop from the Dominion residents of Liverpool.  There is little physical evidence now of the association of the King's Colonials with these localities or for that matter their headquarters in London except mementos like that shown in Figure 5.  The Liverpool Troop were attached to ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) for training and housed in the Headquarters of the Liverpool Scottish.  

The entry from Gore's Liverpool Directory, 1911 edition provides the address of the Liverpool Troop as King Edwards Horse, The Kings Overseas Dominions Regiment, Northern District Detachment, HQ 2 Church Street W, Liverpool under the command of Captain W. Bancroft Pearch.

Figure 5: A repoussed silver sugar shaker as a wedding gift to Trooper Thornton engraved from his comrades of the Liverpool Detachment of the King’s Colonials (The saleroom.com).

Political manoeuvring within the War Office by 1907 led to several of the self-governing Dominions seeing advantage in recognising the value of the King’s Colonials as a volunteer force in which they could be boldly represented.  This then led to several alliances being formed between Colonial units namely the 8th (Princess Louise’s) New Brunswick Hussars in 1907 and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th Australian Horse and Border Light Horse (Cape Colonial Forces) in 1908.  The year of 1908, saw changes to the structure of the Army and the creation of the Territorial Force which led to the Regiment no longer being administered through the County of London Territorial Force Association but under its own association.

In 1909, due the Crown Colonies having gained Dominion status, the term ‘Colony Squadrons’ was abolished.  From this time on the Squadrons were mixed in composition with new recruits allocated to the Squadron best suited to their training needs rather than on the traditional Dominion association or origin.  At this time, the Regimental strength stood at 27 Officers and 444 Other Ranks.  From April 1909 to January 1913, the Commanding Officer was Colonel H. Fortescue CBE, late of the 17th Lancers (Figure 6, bottom image).  

Figure 6: Colonel H. Fortescue, Commanding Officer from April 1909 to January 1913, in Service Dress uniform (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).

King's Colonials/King Edward's Horse 1910-12


The photograph in Figure 7 depicts one of the last formal engagements of the King’s Colonials when a small detachment marched in the funeral procession of King Edward VII on 20th May 1910.

Figure 7: King’s Colonials in Full Dress uniform marching in the funeral procession of King Edward VII on 20th May 1910 near Paddington station, London (R. J. Smith collection).

In 1910, an exchange relationship was established between the 8th Australian Light Horse Regiment (Victorian Mounted Rifles) and ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) of the King’s Colonials.   Again Colonial interest in the Regiment continued to grow and alliances were formed with  the 13th, 14th and 15th Light Horse (Queensland Mounted Infantry) and the 10th, 11th and 19th Light Horse (Victorian Mounted Rifles) and the 1st, 5th and 8th Regiments, New Zealand Mounted Rifles.

Following the death of King Edward VII in 1910 it was decided that, due to the self-governing Dominions dislike of being referred to as Colonials, the Regiment should be renamed.  On the 12th July 1910, the Regimental title changed to the 4th County of London Yeomanry, King Edward's Horse (the King's Overseas Dominions Regiment) (Figure 8).

Figure 8:  A King Edward’s Horse (The King’s Overseas Dominions Regiment) recruiting postcard circa 1910 (Reproduced with the permission of the Australian War Memorial). 

Lord Strathcona made a donation of £10,000 to the Regimental funds for the King’s Colonials to finance the change of name and the adoption of new uniforms and badges for the King Edward’s Horse

King George V became Colonel in Chief of the 4th County of London Yeomanry, King Edward's Horse (the King's Overseas Dominions Regiment on 2nd September 1910.

The Regimental Headquarters was at Grove House, Holywood Road in Fulham and moved to the Duke of York’s Headquarters, King’s Road, Chelsea in 1911.

In 1912, ‘A’ Squadron was broken up and the Liverpool Troop under Major Pearch became ‘A’ Squadron in its entirety, while the original two Troops of ‘A’ Squadron were transferred to ‘D’ Squadron.  It is reported that recruitment in Liverpool became so brisk that the change was inevitable.

Figure 8a:  A three foot long brass and timber plaque of the King Edward's Horse that was thought to have hung in the barracks of the Liverpool Troop in Aigburth, Liverpool.  Purchased by Chris Owen, a member of the Great War Forum about 20 years ago from a pawn brokers shop in North Wales where it had sat on the wall for 30 years.

The Regiment, comprising 29 Officers and 401 Other Ranks was transferred from the Territorial Force to the Special Reserve on the 31st August 1912 as part of the London Mounted Brigade.

King Edward's Horse 1913-14


King Edward's Horse 1913-14 King Edward's Horse 1913-14
Lieutenant Colonel Victor Sandeman (Figure 9), having seen service in the 17th Lancers joined the King’s Colonials on the 20th July 1904.  He became Commanding Officer of the 4th County of London Yeomanry, King Edward's Horse (the King's Overseas Dominions Regiment) from January 1913 to June 1914 and again after a period of ill health from the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 to June 1916.

Figure 9, upper image:  Lieutenant Colonel Victor Sandeman, Commanding Officer from January 1913 to June 1914 and August 1914 to June 1916 (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).

The King Edward’s Horse was mobilised for war on the 4th August 1914.  For many Troopers it was a card to loved ones back home and off to ‘the grand adventure’ (Figure 10).

Figure 10, bottom image:  A mounted Trooper (Ernest ---) of King Edward’s Horse writes home to his sister as he sets off to war. He is equipped with a .303 Short Medium Lee Enfield Mark 1 rifle (in its holster) and 1908 pattern cavalry sword (Image from an online auction site).

King Edward's Horse 1915-16


King Edward's Horse 1915-16 King Edward's Horse 1915-16
The following is a brief summary of the Regiment’s movements in the Great War:

  • Embodied 4th August 1914 in Chelsea where it was training with the 4th Cavalry Brigade.  It was mobilised to Watford (Figure 11, upper image) and moved to Bishop Storford in March 1915 (Figure 12, bottom image). 
Figure 11, upper image:  No. 3 Troop of ‘C’ Squadron at Gammons Farm, Watford in 1914 the captioning ‘en route for Berlin’ by the Troopers capturing the optimism and excitement of the early stages of the Great War (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. 19: 16, 1952).
  

Figure 12, bottom image:  Lieutenant Colonel Victor Sandeman (seated centre front row, as shown in Figure 7) with Captain R. D. Furse (third from left front row) and other Officers of King Edwards Horse at Bishop’s Storford in April 1915 (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. Number 20: 12, 1953).   

  • Numbered 1st King Edward’s Horse but served with the Divisional Cavalry as independent Squadrons until 1st June 1916.

In April 1915, the Regiment was split up:

  • ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) was attached to 12th Division at Aldershot from 23rd May 1915 and landed at Havre, France on 2nd June 1916 to join IV Corps Cavalry Regiment

  • ‘B’ Squadron (Canadian) landed at Havre on 22 April 1915 and joined 48th (South Midland) Division and then IV Corps Cavalry Regiment on 1st June 1916

  • ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) together with Regimental HQ landed at Havre on 22nd April 1915 and joined 47th (London) Division and then joined IV Corps Cavalry Regiment on 1st June 1916

King Edward's Horse 1916-18


King Edward's Horse 1916-18 King Edward's Horse 1916-18
  • The three Squadrons and Regimental HQ was concentrated at Valhuon as IV Corps Cavalry Regiment on 1st June 1916 (Figure 13, upper image). The Regiment moved to XVIII Corps on 17th July 1917 returning to IV Corps in November 1917.
Figure 13, upper image:  King Edward’s Horse Hotchkiss Gun Team at Valhuon June 1916.   Named to Alexander, Watts?, Rees/Reeves?, Smith, Johnston, Pristley, Mathieson, O’Connor, Molloy, Ferreira, Willis, MeVoy, Watts?, McCracken, - and Sadler (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades’ Association Bulletin. 20: 22, 1953).

  • The Regiment then moved to Italy on 15th December 1917 joining XI Corps.

  • On 16th March 1918 the Regiment moved back to France with XI Corps.

  • In May 1918, ‘A’ Squadron stayed with XI Corps, while ‘B’ Squadron went to I Corps and ‘C’ Squadron to XIII Corps (moving to XIII Corps in October 1918). (Figure 14, bottom image).
Figure 14, bottom image: 4th Troop of ‘C’ Squadron in France in December 1918.  Captioned with - back row from left: 3rd Barton, 4th Charters, 6th Tetley and 7th McCormack.  Centre row: Milroy, Fisher, Roberts, Wooding and Glasspool.  Front row second from left: Barton?  The Trooper far left in the back row wears a ribbon for a gallantry decoration as does the Trooper far left centre row and the Sergeant next to him.   The Sergeant in the middle of the centre row wears two gallantry medal ribbons and a brass wound stripe on his lower left forearm of his tunic.  Great War service medals and ribbons were generally not worn until late 1918 for the 1914/15 Star and later for the additional Great War medals.  (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. 19: 13, 1952).  

King Edward's Horse 1918


Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James DSO, became Commanding Officer in June 1916 and served in that capacity until 1922 (Figure 16).  He had joined the King’s Colonials as a Lieutenant in February 1902 and was promoted to Captain, a year to the day on 2nd February 1903 and then to Major on 11th June 1906.

Figure 16:  Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James, CBE DSO, Commanding Officer June 1916 to 1922.  Lieutenant Colonel James is wearing the Officer’s Service Dress uniform of the King Edward’s Horse (Darren O’Brien collection).

The Colonial spirit and camaraderie certainly lived on with the King Edward’s Horse and even though the individual Squadrons were no longer known by their Dominion association, the Troopers were often photographed with their comrades from the Dominion (see Figure 17 and Figure 18 on the next page).

Figure 17:  Photograph of some of the Rhodesian members of the King Edward’s Horse circa 1914-19 (National Archives of Zimbabwe). 
King Edward's Horse 1918 King Edward's Horse 1918

King Edward's Horse Reserve


King Edward's Horse Reserve King Edward's Horse Reserve
A Reserve Squadron was formed at Chelsea in August 1914 to provide a cadre of Troopers to the other four Squadrons.  The Reserve Squadron moved to Bishop Storford in May 1915, crossed to Ireland in July 1915.  They were attached to the 8th Reserve Cavalry Regiment at the Curragh (Figure 18, upper image).

Figure 18, upper image:  Australians in the 4th Troop Reserve at Curragh circa 1915. Back row: Haddin, Sullivan, Stretch, L. Leake and Hawkins.  Centre row: Withers, Lieutenant Montgomery, Lieutenant Syme and Corporal Boileau.  Front row: -, E. Leake, -, Fry (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. Number 19: 19, 1952). 

The Squadron moved to Longford, Ireland in April 1916 (Figure 19, bottom image) and then to Dublin in February 1917 where it was expanded to a reserve Regiment.

Figure 19, bottom image:  1st and 2nd Troops of the Reserve Squadron of King Edward’s Horse taken at Longford, Ireland in 1916 (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. Number 20: 20, 1953). 

Reserve Regiment


Reserve Regiment Reserve Regiment
Figure 20, upper image:  Group of Australians serving in the Reserve Squadron of King Edward’s Horse taken at Longford, Ireland in 1916.  The Officers are captioned as MacBean? and Moffat. The Trooper on the far right in the front row is identified as John Gardiner (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. Number 19, 13, 1952). 

In 1917 the Reserve Squadron was commanded by Major (temporary Lieutenant Colonel Martin Foster Dick (Figure 21).  Major Dick had been the Officer in Command of the Mounted Party of the King Edward’s Horse at the 1911 Coronation Parade.  He went on to commanded the Regiment in France in 1917-18.
 
Figure 21, bottom image: Major (temporary Lieutenant Colonel Martin Foster Dick who commanded the Reserve Squadron of King Edward’s Horse in Ireland in 1917 (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).

Battle Honours and Disbandment


Battle Honours and Disbandment Battle Honours and Disbandment
The following Great War Battle Honours were awarded to the Regiment:

  • Loos
  • Ypres 1917
  • Pilckem
  • Cambrai 1917
  • Lys
  • Estaires
  • Hazebrouck
  • Pursuit to Mons
  • France and Flanders 1915-17
  • Italy 1917-18.
The Regiment fought with great distinction at La Bassee Canal on the 12th April 1918 where it held three bridges at a cost of 10 Officers and 150 Other Ranks as casualties out of a unit strength of 450.

The Regiment was disembodied in August 1919 and honourably disbanded on the 31st March 1924 (Figures 21 and 22).  

Figure 21: Letter communicating the honourable disbandment of King Edward’s Horse to the Commonwealth of Australia from the British Government on 14th March 1924 (Reproduced with the permission of the Australian War Memorial).

Figure 22:  New Zealand First Day Cover issued to commemorate the 55th anniversary of the disbandment of King Edward’s Horse on the 31st March 1924.  

2nd King Edward's Horse 1914-17


2nd King Edward's Horse  1914-17  2nd King Edward's Horse  1914-17
There was an additional King Edward’s Horse Regiment formed as cavalry in 1914 and it bears no relation to the original King Edward’s Horse Regiment of yeomanry.  The Regiment became known as the 2nd King Edward's Horse which resulted in references to the original King Edward's Horse during the Great War being sometimes referred to as the (1st) King Edward's Horse but I have chosen not to adopt this nomenclature for the original King Edward's Horse.  

The 2nd King Edward's Horse was raised by John (later Sir John) Norton-Griffiths, a colonial adventurer and Captain/Adjutant of the bodyguard of Lord Robert’s as Commander-in-Chief in the Second Boer War, at his own expense.  A very good short history of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse was written by David Miller (Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, 83:1-10, 2005) and I have drawn heavily on that article for the summary which follows.

The 2nd King Edward’s Horse assembled in White City, London from the 10th August 1914 and initially trained at Langley Park between Slough and Uxbridge (Figure 23, upper right).  The Earl of Lonsdale became their Colonel-in-Chief and they were commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Montagu Cradock CB CMG (see the section on badges of the 2nd King Edward's Horse).  In December 1914 they replaced the Essex Yeomanry in the Eastern Mounted Brigade of the 1st Mounted Division whilst stationed in Essex.  On the 1st February 1915 they transferred to the Canadian Cavalry Brigade at Maresfield. The Brigade was later called 1st Canadian Cavalry Brigade but since there were no others raised they were commonly just called the Canadian Cavalry Brigade.
 
Figure 23:  Copy of a recruiting poster for the 2nd King Edward’s Horse circa 1915. 

The Canadian Cavalry Brigade was made up of the 2nd King Edward's Horse, the Royal Canadian Dragoons, Lord Strathcona's Horse and the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery.  The Brigade deployed to France on 4th May 1915 and the 2nd King Edward’s Horse Regiment fought dismounted as Seely’s Detachment attached to the 1st Canadian Division until September 1915 before re-joining the Canadian Cavalry Brigade.

From January 1915 until January 1916 they were brigaded with the Fife & Forfar Yeomanry until they were replaced by the Fort Garry Horse.  The 2nd King Edward’s Horse acquired a Talbot armoured car in 1915 but it was not used overseas on active service (Figure 24).  On the 27th January 1916, the 2nd King Edward’s Horse re-gained their mounts and formed as a two Squadron Cavalry Regiment with General HQ troops.  In 1915, the 2nd King Edward’s Horse Regimental HQ and ‘A’ Squadron remained with General HQ whilst ‘B’ Squadron went to the 56th Division as Divisional cavalry on the 23rd March 1916 until 30th May 1916.

Figure 24: Photograph of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse Talbot armoured car acquired in 1915 but not used overseas on active service (Original copyright of the Tank Museum, Bovington and reproduced by David Miller in the Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, 83:1-10, 2005).
 
In June 1916, the 2nd King Edward’s Horse were expanded with the addition of a service Squadron of the 21st Lancers from England and became XIV Corps Cavalry Regiment.  The unit became broken up in August 1917 with the 2nd King Edward’s Horse leaving France for Wareham, England on the 5th August 1917 to be absorbed into the Tank Corps.  The Squadron from the 21st Lancers went to No. 5 Base Depot on the 29th August 1917 and was broken up.

A Reserve Squadron was formed which crossed to Ireland in July 1915.  This Squadron was expanded to a Regiment being stationed at Kilkenny in 1917 .

Annual Camps 1902-03


The annual camp was an important training activity for all British army regiments especially the volunteers.  A fortnight under canvas annually was supplemented for the King’s Colonials by intermediate trainings at Easter and Whitsuntide holidays which became annual features from 1904.  The first annual camp of the newly formed King’s Colonials was held at Sidcup in Kent from 14th to 29th June 1902.  The Regiment in camp totaled fourteen Officers and 201 Other Ranks with a strong Squadron released under the command of the Adjutant for the Coronation Review.  Figure 25 is a photograph taken from that first annual camp of the Quarter Guard being mounted by several Troopers of the Australasian Squadron.

Figure 25:  Annual camp in Sidcup, Kent in June 1902.  

In 1903, the annual camp was held at Latimer Camp in Chesham, Buckinghamshire in August of that year under the encouraging and watchful eye of the land holder, Lord Chesham.  Unlike some irregularities with the previous camp the Latimer Park experience was very soldierly.  The camp was attended by eighteen Officers and 202 Other Ranks illustrating the slow growth of the Regiment in the early years.  

The photograph in Figure 26 shows the typical annual camp layout of the precisely aligned and evenly spaced horse lines and men’s tents.  The larger tents in the background are the mess tents.

Figure 26: Annual camp at Latimer Park in Chesham, Buckinghamshire in 1903. 

The annual camps were great training opportunities for marching, parading and horsemanship.

Figure 27: Captain Robert R. Thompson (an Australian who had served as a Sergeant in the 4th Dragoon Guards and Adjutant of the 1st (Volunteer) Australian Horse) and Squadron Sergeant Major Ernest S. Wells (who had served as Regimental Sergeant Major in the 4th Hussars and was promoted to Regimental Sergeant Major in the later King Edward’s Horse in 1911) passing and inspecting recruits at Latimer Camp in 1903. 

Latimer Camp 1903 part 1


On Sunday 9th August 1903 the Regiment attended an open-air church service at Latimer. Colonel Willoughby Wallace gave the readings and present at the service were the men of the 'D' (Chesham) Squadron, The Buckinghamshire Imperial Yeomanry (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars).  In the afternoon games were played and the Chesham prize band played music.

Figures 28 and 30: Fatigue party of New Zealanders of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) King’s Colonial’s with visitors from ‘D’ (Chesham) Squadron, The Buckinghamshire Imperial Yeomanry (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) and civilians in 1903. The 'D NZ' painted on the upturned pales designate these New Zealand Troopers as belonging to ‘D’ Squadron.  ‘D’ Squadron was the British African Squadron but the 3rd Troop was comprised of the New Zealanders who had originally been part of ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) in 1902.  The Troopers (front left and front third from left) are still wearing the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge (and an NCO’s arm badge, Figure 151) prior to the fern badge of the New Zealand Squadron being introduced in 1904.  Other Troopers (rear left-hand two and front right) are wearing the ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge.  

There is a very good description of the Full Dress uniform of the Royal Bucks Hussars (not Imperial) in 'The Yeomanry Force at the 1911 Coronation' by R. J. Smith and R. G. Harris (Picton Publishing, Chippenham, 1988) which matches the uniform worn by the two Buckinghamshire Imperial Yeomanry.   A regulation or low pattern Hussars busby with scarlet bag, white lines and white plume.  Jacket invisible green with scarlet collar and white chest braiding.   Dark blue overalls with double scarlet stripes and white wrist gloves.  

Figure 29:  Quarter Guard tent with a 'C' Squadron (Australasian) Corporal and two Trooper of the King’s Colonials guarding ‘prisoners’ (two Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire policemen and a Royal Army Medical Corps Corporal) at Latimer Camp in 1903. The King’s Colonial’s Trooper on the far right is wearing a cloth band with RMP for Regimental Military Police around his lower left sleeve cuff. 




Latimer Camp 1903 part 2


Figure 31: Troopers of the King’s Colonials washing at Latimer camp in 1903.
 
Figure 32:  Farrier Quartermaster Sergeant Major William H. Ford (born in England in 1874 and enlisted in the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry on the 16th March 1903, re-enlisted in King Edward’s Horse on 1st March 1913, embodied 5th August 1914, landed in France 2nd June 1915 and discharged on the 15th March 1916) with field blacksmith's forge at Latimer Camp in 1903.  The wagons of supplies are clearly marked on the canvas covers for each of the Squadrons (‘A’ British Asian, ‘B’ British American and ‘C’ Australasian) of the King’s Colonials plus those for the Regimental Staff.  A Trooper from 'D' (Chesham) Squadron, The Buckinghamshire Imperial Yeomanry (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) is watching on.  
 

Figure 33: Collecting forage for the horses at Latimer Camp in 1903.  Squadron Sergeant Major Thomson is the figure second from left and Corporal Dick (Regimental number 46) is standing behind him.  Corporal Dick has the distinction shared with Lieutenant Lionel James, as he was in 1902, of being the only two original members of the King’s Colonials to see service throughout the Great War in King Edward’s Horse.  Private Dick hailed from Canada and had seen service in the Boer War with Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Canadian Horse) before joining the King’s Colonials in 1902.  He was commissioned in 1906 and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and commanded the King Edward’s Horse for the last three months of the Great War.  

Training and Sports


Tent pegging with a lance, lemon cutting with the sword and wrestling on horseback were popular sports competitions at the annual camps.  The link for wrestling on horseback will take you to a short YouTube clip which is the only footage I have seen of the King Edward's Horse.  In the Regimental Silver section of this website I have noted that there was even an Officer's Mess Cup for wrestling on horseback.

Figure 34: Tent pegging at Latimer Camp in 1903.

Figure 35:  Sergeant Herbert MacIntosh (for a short biography see the Uniform section) who became the Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant of ‘D’ Squadron ready for tent pegging at Latimer Camp in 1903.  

Figure 36: Lemon cutting, whereby a Trooper mounted on horseback attempted to cut a lemon which had been mounted on a post with his sword during sports at Latimer Camp in 1903. 

St Albans 1904


St Albans 1904 St Albans 1904
Figure 37, upper right:  Rifle training in St Albans camp in 1904.  Trooper DuFoy is the individual named wearing the distinctive Lemon-Squeezer headdress of the New Zealand armed forces and later adopted by the Canadian forces.    
 
Figure 38, lower right:  Corporal Percy Alfred Ely (left, born in 1884 and went on to serve as a Lieutenant in King Edward’s Horse.  He was attached to the New Zealand Expeditionary Force as Assistant Paymaster to the New Zealand Forces and died of pneumonia on the 17th November 1918) with Troopers Pemberton and Liddle stand to their horses.  All three Troopers were from New Zealand and were members of the 3rd Troop (New Zealand) of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) of the King's Colonials in 1904.  

Ovingdean 1905 and Stowe Park 1906


Ovingdean 1905 and Stowe Park 1906
The location of the 1905 annual camp was Ovingdean near Brighton in East Sussex.  Attendance had grown again with 19 Officers and 331 Other Ranks in camp.

Figure 39:  Photographs of the annual camp in Ovingdean near Brighton in 1905 (The Bystander: 35, August 16, 1905).

The location of the 1906 annual camp of the King’s Colonials was Stowe Park in Buckinghamshire.  The Regiment was really coming of age now in its development and discipline and this camp was the most well attended to date with 22 Officers and 353 Other Ranks swelled by the addition of two Troops from the Liverpool detachment.

Churn Camp 1907-08, Pond Farm 1909 and Shorncliffe 1910


Churn Camp 1907-08, Pond Farm 1909 and Shorncliffe 1910 Churn Camp 1907-08, Pond Farm 1909 and Shorncliffe 1910
The annual camps for the King’s Colonials were held at Churn Camp, near Blewbury, Oxfordshire in 1907 and 1908.  The 1907 camp was attended by 21 Officers and 375 Other Ranks this time swelled by the addition of the Cambridge and Oxford detachments.   Attendance was much lower in 1908 with 19 Officers and 294 Other Ranks.  A feature of these particular camps was the inclusion of a Machine Gun Troop within the Regiment.  A Dundonald carriage was used for transporting a Maxim gun and it's ammunition as shown in Figure 40.

Figure 40: Machine Gun Troop of the King’s Colonial Imperial Yeomanry at Churn Camp 1907 (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Comrades Association Annual Bulletin. No 20: 15, 1953).  

We know from the attendance of one of the more famous members of the King’s Colonials, J.R.R. Tolkien who as an undergraduate student of Oxford University attended their annual camp in 1909 at Pond Farm Camp, Tidworth Pennings on Salisbury Plain (John Garth: Tolkien and The Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth. London: HarperCollins, 2003).  Here they were camped as a Brigade with the other four mounted regiments of the London Command and were in strength with 24 Officers and 415 Other Ranks.

The 1910 camp was also held on Salisbury Plain at Shorncliffe Camp with reduced numbers at 20 Officers and 327 Other Ranks.  This was the first camp for the Regiment as King Edward's Horse.  

Figure 41:  Officers and Other Ranks from ‘A’ Squadron, King Edward’s Horse at Shorncliffe Camp in 1910.  The headdress badge being worn is that of the King Edward’s Horse (R. J. Smith collection).  



Aldershot 1911 and Dibgate 1912


The efficiency of the Regiment was questioned in the official report on this camp which had some bearing on the push by the Commanding Officer for the 1911 camp of the King Edward’s Horse to be held at Aldershot and closer to army command.   A total of five senior Officers including General Sir John French inspected the Regiment at this camp and this time the report to the Colonel-in-Chief was much more positive.

Figure 42: Officers of King Edward's Horse with General French, Aldershot 1911.  Left to right seated front: 1. Staff Officer, 2. Major Hamilton, 3. Captain Coote, Adjutant 17th Lancers, 4.  Major Lionel James, 5. Major Sanderman, 6. General Sir John French, 7. Colonel Fortescue, 8-11. Staff Officers, 12. Major Howard. Left to right standing: 8th from left Major Harmon with raised hand.  Middle row standing 4th from left Lieutenant G. G. Russell later Colonel (R. J. Smith collection). 

Figure 42a: King Edward’s Horse Troopers from ‘C’ Squadron mucking out at annual camp at Aldershot in 1911. The postcard is amusingly labelled 'Afternoon Off’.  The khaki service caps have white bands as opposed to cap covers which might have been worn to distinguish 'foe from friend' whilst on maneuvers.  

The July-August 1912 annual camp of King Edward’s Horse was held at Dibgate Plateau, Shorncliffe in Kent with severe gales a noted feature.

Figure 43:  A unique photograph of ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’ Squadrons of King Edward’s Horse assembled in mounted order at annual camp on Dibgate Plateau, Shorncliffe in Kent in July-August 1912 (R. J. Smith collection).

Bulford 1913


The annual camp for 1913 was held in July-August in Bulford on the Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire.  

Figure 44: King Edward’s Horse on annual camp in Bulford in July-August 1913.  

Figure 45: King Edward’s Horse with the Regimental band on church parade in Bulford in July-August 1913.  

Figure 46: Troopers of ‘A’ Squadron of King Edward’s Horse at camp in Bulford in 1913 (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. Number 20: 12, 1952). 

King's Colonials Officer's Full Dress Uniform 1901-04


One of the most comprehensive descriptions of the uniforms of the King's Colonials appeared in an article by R. J. Smith (see acknowledgement of photographs and annotations) with illustrations by R. J. Marrion in the July 1984 edition of 'Military Modelling' magazine.   The following sections sample that description.  

On formation in November 1901, the Officers and Other Ranks of the King’s Colonials adopted a distinctive Full Dress uniform of khaki serge tunic and overalls set off by a garish, tall, high-crowned, drab felt hat which was not dented at the top. The Tyrolean-shaped top hat was set off by a scarlet plume at the front and a broad brim which was turned up and fastened to the left side of the crown. Another unique feature of the top hat was that it bore three badges (see headdress badge section). The plume on the Officer’s hat was made up of scarlet hackle feathers which stood much taller than the simple Hussar-type short brush worn by Other Ranks. Around the base of the top hat was a two-inch scarlet band with a bow on the right-hand side and scarlet cap lines were secured by a spring clip to a ring at the rear of the brim. This style of headdress was worn until 1904.

The Officer’s and Other Rank’s Full Dress uniform was worn with tan wrist gloves and tan Wellington boots for Officers and tan ankle boots and leggings for Other Ranks, all fitted with plated box spurs.  Although D. J. Knight and R. J. Smith in their description of the uniform of the King's Colonials note that all ranks wore brown Elcho boots (The Uniforms of the Imperial Yeomanry 1901-1908, The Military Historical Society, Arrow Press, London 2009).  The waist belt for all was of brown brindle leather.  A pouch belt of 2 ½ inch brown brindle leather and a brown brindle leather pouch to the rear with a rounded flap was worn by Officers.  The pouch belt was adorned with gilt front ornaments consisting of a lion’s head holder with three chains and a whistle.  The pouch belt was worn over the Sam Browne belt for parades.  Officers carried swords in a leather scabbards suspended from the Sam Browne belt with a leather sword knot.  

The Officer’s and Other Rank’s tunic had a stand-and-fall (Prussian) collar with two ¾ inch scarlet cloth rings with pointed ends to the front.  The pointed cuffs were piped in scarlet cloth and bore five vertical stripes of ¾ inch scarlet cloth.  Each stripe was furnished with a small button at the top edge of the cuff.  The tunic was fastened with five larger buttons and bore four breast pockets each fastened with a smaller button.  The buttons were gilt for Officers and gilding metal for Other Ranks.  The front edge of the tunic was not piped but there was scarlet lancer piping to the back seams.  Shoulder chains were mounted on a scarlet cloth backing and were secured by four hooks.  A scarlet aiguillette was worn looped across and behind the left shoulder with the pommel ends finishing below the right shoulder.

Figure 47: Photograph of Lieutenant Colonel N. Willoughby Wallace, Commanding Officer of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform circa 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 48: Photograph of Lieutenant George Hamilton of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform circa 1903-05.  Note the pouch belt and three badges to his first pattern felt hat.  He is wearing three medals which appear to be the Queen’s South Africa with three bars, a King’s South Africa with two bars and possible a General Service Medal with one bar (From an electronic auction site).


Figure 49:  Painting of an Officer of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform circa 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).



























































.

King's Colonials Officer's Full Dress Tunic


King's Colonials Officer's Full Dress Tunic King's Colonials Officer's Full Dress Tunic
Figures 50 and 51: Photographs of the front and rear of an Officer’s Full Dress tunic of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry complete with brindle leather pouch belt and pouch, 1901-1904 originally on display at the National Army Museum, London (R. J. Smith collection). 

King's Colonials Other Ranks Full Dress 1901-04


Other Ranks wore a Boer War pattern, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandolier diagonally across the left shoulder in place of the Officer’s pouch belts.

Non-Commissioned Officer’s (NCO's) chevrons were of gold lace on a scarlet cloth backing.  Khaki skill-at-arms badges were worn on the left cuff on scarlet cloth backings. The overalls had a double scarlet cloth stripe running down the outer seam for Officers and a single scarlet cloth stripe for Other Ranks.

The regimental badges and buttons of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry are described in detail in  additional sections.  The rank and trade badges are, however, described in the current section as part of the description of the uniforms of the Regiment.

Figure 52: Photograph of a Trooper of ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform mounting guard whilst on annual summer camp in Sidcup, London in 1902.  He is wearing cloth leggings and is equipped with a Boer War pattern, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandolier and a .303 Small Magazine Lee Enfield Mark 1 rifle. The King’s Colonials headdress and collar badges are described in the relevant sections.  

Figure 53: Photograph of Trooper (Private) Angel of ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform (Review Order 1901-1904) with cloak, gloves and whip circa 1903.  Private Angel is wearing three headdress badges and first pattern collar badges of the King’s Colonials as described in  the King's Colonials badge sections (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 54: General Trotter inspects the Ranks of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform on Horse Guards Parade on the 27th April 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).

King's Colonials Other Ranks Full Dress part 2


Figures 53 and 54:  Paintings of the front and rear of a Trooper of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform circa 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 54a: A Corporal and Trooper of 'B' Squadron (British American) of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform at annual camp in 1902 (R. J. Smith collection with photograph taken by Harry Payne).

King's Colonials Undress Uniform 1901-04


The Undress uniform of the King’s Colonials Officers and Other Ranks was as per the Full Dress uniform except worn with a flat, broad khaki forage cap with three scarlet welts, khaki peak with no piping and a tan strap.  This uniform was also worn as Walking Out Order with the addition of a cape, tan gloves and a whip.  The King’s Colonials were one of the first regiments to be equipped with the khaki forage caps which became widespread throughout the British Army from about 1906.  The forage caps were often worn with a white oilskin cover to protect the top of the cap from finger marks and foul weather.
 
Figure 55: Photograph of an Officer’s first pattern forage cap in khaki with three scarlet welts, khaki peak and tan strap circa 1903 (R. J. Smith collection).
 
 Figure 56:  Photograph of Corporal Herbert Harris Shaw of ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Undress uniform showing the khaki forage cap with ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge and first pattern Regimental collar badges circa 1905.  Corporal Shaw was born in 1893 in Teignmouth, Devon, England and served in ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry from 1902 to 1907.  Prior to this service, he served in the Bechuanaland Border Police 1894-95 and the Matabele Mounted Police in 1896.  Having emigrated to Sydney, Australia he enlisted as a Private in the 35th Battalion (Newcastle’s Own), 9th Brigade of the 1st Australian Imperial Force on the 12th April 1916.  He embarked for England on board the HMAT Anchises A68 on the 24th August 1916.  Attaining the rank of Extra Regimental Sergeant, he was wounded in action on the 12th October 1917.  He was a photographer by profession and assisted the noted Australian World War One photographer Frank Hurley after the war.  His British War and Victory medals are held in the Dave Harrower Collection in New South Wales, Australia (Peter Nemaric collection). 

Figure 57:  Photograph of a mounted Sergeant Herbert MacIntosh of the 3rd (New Zealand) Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry circa 1904.  He is wearing Undress uniform with the Second Pattern forage cap in khaki with a white cap cover and has a ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) arm badge above his gold rank chevrons and is wearing first pattern Regimental collar badges.  He is equipped with the standard cavalry and yeomanry .303 Short Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) Mark 1 rifle.  Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant MacIntosh was born in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1871 and served with the King’s Colonials from 1902 until 1906 and died in March 1957.   His tunic is depicted being worn in 1939 in Figure 60.   His actual tunic complete with New Zealand collar badges, overalls and gaiters are those shown in Figures 61-66.  Sergeant Quarter Master MacIntosh wrote proudly in the King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades Association Bulletin in 1946 that he still prized owning his tunic and was disappointed not to be able to wear it and ride in the Procession as part of the Christchurch Centennial Celebrations of 1950 (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades Association Bulletin. 18: 18, 1951).  

King's Colonials Service Dress 1901-04


King's Colonials Service Dress 1901-04 King's Colonials Service Dress 1901-04
The Service Dress uniform worn by the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry from 1901-1904 was of a plain regular cavalry pattern khaki tunic with a stand-and-fall (Prussian) collar and overalls for Officers and Other Ranks.   In Officers Service Dress only the Sam Browne belts were worn with the whistle attached to the shoulder brace.  The distinctive scarlet cap lines worn by all ranks in Full Dress were dispensed with.  From 1901 to 1904 a plain khaki peaked cap was worn with three scarlet welts. Other Ranks wore webbing bandoliers without cartridge covers.  Service Dress was first introduced into the British Army in 1902 and became largely universal from 1903.

From 1904, a new khaki Service Dress was adopted with a second pattern, scarlet and khaki peaked cap.  

Figure 58:  A group from the 1st or 2nd Troop (British African) and 3rd Troop (New Zealand) of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry circa 1904.  They are wearing the Service Dress uniform with the second pattern khaki forage cap.  The Officer of the 3rd Troop in the centre of the front row is wearing  his Undress uniform with the Australasian Squadron headdress badge.  To his immediate left is the Regimental Quarter Master Sergeant wearing a Second Pattern Regimental pattern headdress badge.  The Squadron Sergeant Major of the 1st or 2nd Troop with the ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge is at the very left of the front row.  Sergeant MacIntosh (Figure 57) is seated second from the right-hand end in the front row.  Several of the Other Ranks are equipped with Boer War pattern, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandoliers.  

Figure 58a: Comparison of the King's Colonials tunic and headdress for a Private, Full Dress 1902 (left panel) and Service Dress 1904 (right panel) (D. J. Knight and R. J. Smith. The Uniforms of the Imperial Yeomanry 1901-1908. The Military Historical Society, Arrow Press, London, 2009).

King's Colonials Mess Dress 1901-04


King's Colonials Mess Dress 1901-04
Officer’s Mess Dress was of a dark blue jacket with a ribbed scarlet silk rolled collar.  Further information as to the lapel badges worn on Mess Dress which differ from the small gilt Regimental badges is provided in the collar badge section.   The cuffs were round unlike the pointed cuffs of Full Dress and in a further change from Full Dress had four rather than five stripes of ¾ inch scarlet cloth of equal length without buttons.  Shoulder straps were in blue cloth with a single stripe again of ¾ inch scarlet cloth down the centre.  Badges of rank were in gold.  The jacket was worn with a white Marcella waistcoat and shirt with a black bow tie.  The overalls were blue with double stripes in scarlet cloth complimented by black Wellington boots (not tan as with Full Dress) and dress spurs.  

Figure 59: King’s Colonials Officer’s Mess Dress 1902-05 (Reproduced with permission of Griff Morgan-Jones).

Other Ranks Mess Dress consisted of a khaki jacket with scarlet silk roll collar upon which was worn a variation of the Regimental badge in gilt (see collar badge section).  The cuffs were khaki and pointed with four stripes (unlike the five for Full Dress and Undress) of ¾ inch scarlet cloth without buttons and followed the shape of the cuff.  The waistcoat was khaki with three small gilt buttons (see button section) was worn over a white shirt with a black bow tie. The Mess Dress uniform was completed with khaki overalls and black Wellington boots again not tan with Full Dress.

King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10


King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10 King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10
In 1905, the regimental title was simplified to the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry and a less flamboyant Second Pattern of headdress known as the ‘Sombrero hat’ was introduced for the Full Dress uniform.  The Sombrero hat had a significantly reduced crown now in proportion and was a light shade of drab felt with a wide brim bound with drab silk.  The brim was curled around the edge sweeping up on the left side.  A scarlet silk puggaree made up of three deep folds was worn around the base.  A plume socket on the left side brim held a plume of long black cock’s feathers which swept down to the wearer’s left shoulder bersaglieri fashion.  The plume of black cock’s feathers was longer for Officer’s relative to that of the Other Ranks.  The cap lines disappeared and all bar one of the headdress badges was dispensed with as detailed in a later section.  Officer's swords were now carried on parade in a steel scabbard from leather slings beneath the tunic.  

Figure 60:  Photograph showing the simplified Second Pattern headdress being worn as part of the Full Dress uniform by an Officer and Other Ranks of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry circa 1905-06.   The Officer and Other Ranks are wearing ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) headdress and collar badges (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 61:  Photograph showing the Second Pattern headdress being worn as part of the Full Dress uniform of a Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (standing far left), NCOs and Other Ranks of the 3rd (New Zealand) Troop of ‘D’ (South African) Squadron of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry circa 1905-06. The Regimental Quarter Master Sergeant is wearing a Second Pattern Regimental headdress badge and the Other Ranks are wearing New Zealand headdress and matching collar badges.   The two trumpeters seated in the front row are both wearing cloth trumpeter arm badges on the left upper sleeve (shown in Denis Edwards and David Langley: British Army Proficiency Badges. The Sherwood Press, Nottingham, 1984 as 156A).  The corporal trumpeter on the left is wearing his cloth trumpeter arm badge above his two rank chevrons.  The Senior NCOs are carrying swords and the Other Ranks are wearing Boer War period, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandoliers (David Stewart collection).



King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10


King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10 King's Colonials Full Dress 1905-10
Figure 62:  Portrait photograph of Trooper in 'B' Squadron (British American) of the King's Colonials wearing his Full Dress uniform complete with second pattern headdress, gloves and cloak circa 1905-10.  His 'B" Squadron (British American) beaver and maple leaf collar badge can be clearly seen as is the top of the matching headdress badge.  He is wearing the early pattern webbing bandolier.

Figure 62a:  Drawing of the tunic and headdress for the Full Dress uniform of a Private of the King's Colonials, 1905-10 of the New Zealand Troop (D. J. Knight and R. J. Smith. The Uniforms of the Imperial Yeomanry 1901-1908. The Military Historical Society, Arrow Press, London, 2009).

King's Colonials Full Dress Tunic


The tunic depicted here bears a label with the name MacIntosh written upon it with a D for 'D' Squadron and SMS for Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant signifying that it belonged to Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant (SQMS) Herbert MacIntosh of the 3rd (New Zealand) Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry.  The tunic was acquired in New Zealand together with several copies of The King Edwards Horse Senior and Junior Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletins in which SQMS MacIntosh had underlined his name in the list of members.  This style of tunic does not bear breast pockets and buttons.

The manufacturers label sewn into the King’s Colonials’ Service Dress overalls was that of Hobson and Sons of London.  Hobson and Sons are still in business today in Golden Grove, London and were a preferred manufacturer of Officer’s and Other Rank’s British and Colonial regimental and ceremonial, uniforms and buttons.  It is noted that the uniforms of the Australian Contingent attending the coronation of King Edward VII in 1902 were also manufactured by Hobson and Sons.   There may have been other manufacturers of the uniforms of the King’s Colonials which is certainly true for the buttons on their tunics.

The King's Colonials uniform shown was originally accompanied by a New Zealand Squadron water bottle with felt cover and leather strap.  The felt cover was marked on front 'KC 57' and the top of metal stopper marked 'NZ'.  

Figures 63 and 64: The front and rear of the Full Dress tunic worn by Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant MacIntosh of the 3rd New Zealand troop of ‘D’ Squadron (South African), 4th County of London (King’s Colonial’s) Imperial Yeomanry, circa 1905-06.  The tunic was made by Hobson and Sons, London and bears the name MacIntosh on the inside rear of the collar.  

Figure 65:  Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant Herbert MacIntosh of the 3rd (New Zealand) Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry.  He is wearing his Full Dress tunic (shown in the photographs which follow) and Second Pattern, Sombrero hat (without the plume of cock’s feathers) bearing the New Zealand headdress badge, khaki overalls and tan wrist gloves and leather gaiters.  This photograph was taken after his visit to England in 1939 (The King Edwards Horse Senior and Junior Comrades’ Association Annual Bulletin. 15: 22, 1948).   

King's Colonials Full Dress Collar


Figures 66 - 68:  Close-up of the scarlet double striped collar with New Zealand Squadron collar badges of the Full Dress tunic and service overalls with owners name on the label from the tunic circa 1905-06. 

King's Colonials Full Dress Detail


Figures 69 -71:  Close-ups of the shoulder scales and cuff detail of the Full Dress tunic and manufacturers label from the inside lining of the overalls circa 1905-06.  The Crossed Rifles badge is a proficiency badge for musketry worn by Sergeants and is referenced as 23A in Denis Edwards and David Langley's: British Army Proficiency Badges, The Sherwood Press Nottingham, 1984.  

King's Colonials Full Dress Leathers


Figures 72 - 74:  Pair of tan, wrist riding gloves (made by Dent, England) and brown brindle leather leggings and cuffs worn together with the Full Dress uniform circa 1905-06.  

King's Colonials Undress Uniform 1905-10


King's Colonials Undress Uniform 1905-10
The Undress uniform of the Officers of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry was a Second Pattern, peaked blue cloth forage cap with a scarlet band bearing a gilt Regimental badge, scarlet piping around the crown seam and black patent leather peak and chin strap held in place with two gilt Regimental pattern buttons.  Plain blue trousers with turn-ups and black ankle boots completed the Officer’s Undress uniform.   Field Officers had a gold embroidered edge to the peak of the forage cap; a blue serge coat with optional shoulder chains with four patch pockets, five gilt buttons to the front, one on each breast pocket and two buttons on each cuff.  Some of these uniform details can be distinguished on the Field Officer on the left in the second row.

Figure 75:  Photograph of a group of Officers of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry in Undress uniform with the Second Pattern Forage Cap in blue cloth and a black peak with and without a white cap cover circa 1906.   Field Officer’s with gold embroidered peaks to their forage caps and wearing frock coats are on the far left and right in the second row.  The ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) Officer seated front right is wearing a ‘C’ Squadron headdress badge and his rank chevrons on his sleeve of his Service Dress uniform (R. J. Smith collection).

The Undress uniform of the Other Ranks of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry was as per the Full Dress uniform except that a khaki forage cap with scarlet band but no piping and a dark brown leather peak and chin strap with brass buttons and a brass Regimental pattern badge.  A khaki cloak was worn when walking out and tan leather gloves and a whip were carried.

King's Colonials Caricuture


The public interest in the King’s Colonials was considerable thanks to their prominence in many parades and ceremonial occasions coupled with the richness of their Full Dress and Undress uniforms.  These two postcards illustrate how the uniforms and demeanour of the King’s Colonials was expressed in caricature.

Figure 76:  Postcard of a caricature of a King’s Colonial circa 1906.

Figures 77 and 78:  Front and reverse of a postcard depicting a tongue in cheek caricature of a King’s Colonial posted in 1910.  The sender writes ‘of course no one suggests you look like this’.  

King's Colonials Service Dress 1905-10


The Officers and Other Ranks of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry wore the standard British Army Service Dress khaki tunic with a stand-and-fall collar with or without shoulder chains from about 1904 (Figures 47-51).  Regulation Service Dress replaced both Full Dress and Undress uniforms for the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry from about 1907 when it became standard uniform for the cavalry and yeomanry.   The Officers rank was displayed on the cuff from 1907/08. 

Figure 79:  Mounted Troopers of the Australian, British African and New Zealand Troops of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry wearing a mixture of standard British Army Service Dress tunics and Undress tunics at signal training probably at annual camp circa 1908.   The Sergeant is wearing a standard British Army Service Dress tunic with ‘C’ Squadron headdress and matching collar badges (Iain Davidson collection).
 
Figure 80:  A photograph of the Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (left, front row) wearing a Second Pattern Regimental headdress badge, the Squadron Sergeant Major (left, rear row) wearing the ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge, Sergeant MacIntosh (right, rear row) and a Corporal ( right, front row) of the 3rd Troop (New Zealand) of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) wearing Australasian headdress badges of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry wearing standard British Army Service Dress tunics, overalls and the first pattern khaki forage caps circa 1904.  The Officer of the 3rd Troop, ‘D’ Squadron (British African) (middle, rear row) is wearing Undress uniform with the Australasian headdress badge. Sergeant MacIntosh is equipped with a Boer War period, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandolier and puttees.
 
Figure 81:  A photograph of Private Sydney Harris (sitting) and fellow Troopers of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) during the annual camp of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry wearing different styles of unofficial Undress uniform headdress and Boer War period, 50-round Mills equipment webbing bandolier circa 1905.  Private Harris and the Trooper on the far right are wearing a distinctive New Zealand ‘Lemon-Squeezer’ headdress and the Trooper second from right is wearing his Full Dress Sombrero hat with the brim turned up to one side and without the plume of cock’s feathers (Carole McEntee-Taylor. From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer: The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris. London: Pen and Sword, 2015).
 
 

King's Colonials Service Dress 1905-10 cont.


King's Colonials Service Dress 1905-10 cont. King's Colonials Service Dress 1905-10 cont.
A group photograph at annual camp circa 1905-10 of 'D' Squadron (British African) of the King's Colonials wearing Service Dress.  The Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant is wearing his crown above the four Quartermaster chevrons on both lower sleeves.  He wears the Regimental badge in his cap unlike the majority of the Other Ranks wearing Squadron headdress (many with cap covers) badges and Squadron collar badges.  Shoulder chains and titles are not being worn in this group photograph.  

Figure 81a:  A group photograph at annual camp circa 1905-10 of 'D' Squadron (British African) of the King's Colonials wearing Service Dress.

Figure 81b: A close up from the group photograph (Figure 81a) of the Service Dress uniform of the Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant. 

King's Colonials Service Dress Tunic 1905-10


Figures 81a-b: A King's Colonials Service Dress tunic for the New Zealand Troop of 'D' Squadron (British African) circa 1905-1910.  The tunic has New Zealand fern brass collar badges, King's Colonials brass buttons, a scarlet King’s Crown at the top of the right sleeve for a Squadron Sergeant Major with a pair of holes in the tunic through which a New Zealand NCO's arm badge would have been attached, and a scarlet woven marksman badge at the bottom of the left cuff. The shoulders are fitted with thin scarlet cord straps (Photographs courtesy of Medallion Militaria). 

Figure 81c: Postcard taken by J. T. Newman, a Berkhamsted photographer depicting members of 'A' (British Asian) Squadron of the King's Colonials at lunch at the Fox and Hounds Inn, Bourne End, Hertfordshire, posted in 1908. (The Fox and Hounds Inn was first licensed in 1863 and was demolished some time after 1940.  The Bourne End area is now designated as being in Bedfordshire).  They are wearing Service Dress uniforms and the thin (scarlet) cord straps are clearly visible. The Officer (with pouch belt) standing on the left is wearing a New Zealand headdress badge whereas the others are all wearing British Asian headdress badges and matching collar badges. The seated figure to the immediate left of this Officer is wearing an 'A' (British Asian) Squadron headdress badge as an NCO's arm badge. The Other Ranks are all wearing bandoliers. 

King’s Colonials Bandsman's Uniform 1901-10


The Regiment's Military Band’s First Pattern felt hat worn with the Full Dress uniform differed from that of the regular 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry felt hat in that its plume had a white base and it carried a gilt lyre badge below the Regimental badge to the front and turned up side of the headdress.
 
Figure 82:  Trumpet Major Peter Anderson, Bandmaster of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform circa 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).
 
Figure 83:  Trumpet Major Peter Anderson, Bandmaster leading the band of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Full Dress uniform at Horse Guards Parade on April 27th 1902 (R. J. Smith collection).


Sergeant Henry C. Bottle, a clarinetist in the military band of the King Edward’s Horse describes the uniform in Number 32 of The King Edward’s Horse Old Comrades Association Bulletin: Cap - Brown with a red band; Jacket – Brown, small gilt buttons, heavy red braid epaulettes and red braid cords with two-pointed gilt metal tabs at end; Belt (Lancer waist belt in King Edwards Horse colours – King Edward VII racing colours); Overalls – Brown with double red stripes; Boots – Black wellingtons inside overalls.  The Undress uniform khaki forage cap again differed from that worn by the regular 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry by having a scarlet top of the crown and was worn with a gilt lyre badge to the front.

Figure 84:  Band of the King’ Colonials led by Trumpet Major Peter Anderson, Bandmaster (second from left) in Undress uniform 1902.  (Navy and Army Illustrated. London: Elliot & Fry, Volume XIV: Number 274, 147-148, May 3rd 1902).

King’s Colonials Bandsman's Uniform part 2


King’s Colonials Bandsman's Uniform  part 2 King’s Colonials Bandsman's Uniform  part 2
Figure 85:  Band of the King’ Colonials led by Trumpet Major Peter Anderson, Bandmaster (second from left) in Undress uniform circa 1903 (R. J. Smith collection).
 
Figure 86:  Painting of a Bandsman of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry in Undress uniform circa 1902-05, note the scarlet top of the crown of the cap (R. J. Smith collection).



King Edward's Horse Officer's Full Dress Uniform 1910-14


King Edward's Horse Officer's Full Dress Uniform 1910-14 King Edward's Horse Officer's Full Dress Uniform 1910-14
The Officers and Other Ranks Full Dress uniform (except for the headdress and collar badges and buttons remained unchanged in 1910 when the regimental title changed to King Edward’s Horse.  In 1913, a girdle of gold lancer pattern was introduced for Officer’s Full Dress with two crimson silk outer horizontal stripes and Other Rank’s Full Dress made of web striped ¼” inch yellow, ½ inch in red, 1 inch khaki, ½ inch red and ¼ inch in yellow.
 
Figure 87:  Painting of an Officer of the King Edward’s Horse in Full Dress uniform circa 1913 (R. J. Smith collection).
 
Figure 88:  Painting by R.J. Marion of an Officer of the King Edward’s Horse in Full Dress uniform circa 1910-14 (R. J. Smith collection).

King Edward's Horse Other Rank's Full Dress Uniform 1910-14


Figure 89:  A Trooper of the King Edward’s Horse in Full Dress uniform circa 1910-14 (R. C. Whittock: The Military Historical Society, XVII: 61-65, 1967).
   
Figure 90: Regimental Sergeant Major Daniel Fegan (Regimental number 274) in Full Dress uniform of ‘B’ Squadron, King Edward’s Horse circa 1911.  (Copyright Imperial War Museum Q 69197).   He is wearing the Sombrero hat with the brim partially turned up with a sweeping plume of cock’s feathers with the Regimental badge in the pagri and ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badges of the King’s Colonials.  Regimental Sergeant Major Fegan was born in 1851 in Ireland and saw service with the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards, the King’s Colonials and then King Edward’s Horse. 


Figure 91 shows the medals belonging to Regimental Sergeant Major Daniel Fegan with a set of miniatures: the 1902 and 1911 Coronation medals; Egypt medal with ‘Tel-el-Kebir’ bar, Khedives Star; Army Long Service and Good Conduct medal; Army Meritorious Service Medal and the Territorial Force Efficiency medal (Reproduced courtesy of Richard Winterton Auctioneers Ltd, UK).

King’s Edward’s Horse Undress Uniform 1910-14


The Officers and Other Ranks Undress uniform of King Edward's Horse was as per that of the King’s Colonials (1905-10) except with new Regimental badges and buttons were worn with the forage cap and tunic.  
 
Figure 92:  A Permanent Staff Instructor, Staff Squadron Sergeant Major of King Edward’s Horse in Undress uniform with a forage cap with a tan leather peak circa 1912.  He is wearing ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badges, a King Edward’s Horse headdress badge and a bullion crown denoting his rank above a further King Edward’s Horse badge worn above his rank chevrons.  I have not identified his name or medals to date (R. J. Smith collection).
 
Figure 93:  Painting of a Squadron Sergeant Major of the King Edward’s Horse in Undress uniform based upon the photograph in Figure 92 circa 1912.   The Senior NCO in the painting unlike in the photograph is wearing the Lancer style girdle (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 94:  The Undress uniform tunic of a Sergeant of the King Edward’s Horse with Lancer pattern girdle shown draped over the shoulder.  Noted on the tunic are a khaki proficiency trade badge of a harness makers above a King Edward’s Horse arm badge above gold rank chevrons, a pair of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges and brass King Edward’s Horse tunic buttons.  The medal ribbons denotes that the wearer had served in the Great War and were awarded the 1915 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal (Electronic auction site image).
 

King Edward's Horse Undress Tunic 1910-14


Figure 96:  The Undress uniform tunic of a Sergeant of the King Edward’s Horse with a khaki proficiency trade badge of a harness makers above a King Edward’s Horse arm badge above gold rank chevrons, a pair of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges and gilding metal King Edward’s Horse tunic buttons circa 1910-14 (Peter Nemaric collection).   The harness maker's badge was originally to distinguish the trade of a collar maker but was more broadly used over time for saddle maker,  saddletree maker and harness maker and is referenced as 3A in Denis Edwards's and David Langley's: British Army Proficiency Badges. The Sherwood Press Nottingham, 1984.  
 
Figure 97:  Close-up of the collar detail of the Undress tunic of a Sergeant of the King Edward’s Horse circa 1914 showing the Hobson and Sons, London manufacturers label and pair of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges (Peter Nemaric collection).
 
Figure 98:  Close-up of the cuff detail with scarlet stripes and piping of the Undress uniform tunic of a Sergeant of the King Edward’s Horse showing the gilding metal King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks cuff buttons (Peter Nemaric collection).

King Edward’s Horse Service Dress 1910-19


The Service Dress of the King Edward’s Horse remained unchanged from 1910 through to the disbandment of the Regiment in 1924.  This uniform for both Officers and Other Ranks was of standard cavalry pattern of khaki forage cap, tunic and overalls. Shoulder chains were dispensed with for Service Dress.

Officers carried the 1908 pattern cavalry Mark 1 sword and Other Ranks were equipped with .303 SMLE Mark 1 rifles and 1903 pattern, Mounted Infantry leather 50 round bandoliers.  The leather bandolier was 50 inches long and 3.25 inches wide and held 50 .303 cartridges.  It was made up of four sections each x 10 cartridges, plus one section x 6 cartridges and one section x four cartridges.  Towards mobilisation for war in 1914 all ranks were equipped with swords.

Figure 99:  A Trooper of King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress uniform with his partner circa 1914 with 1903-pattern, Mounted Infantry leather 50 round .303 bandolier and King Edward’s Horse Regimental headdress badge.  
 
Figure 100: An Officer, two NCOs and a number of Other Ranks of King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress circa 1914. They are equipped with 1903 pattern, Mounted Infantry leather 50 round .303 bandoliers and are wearing King Edward’s Horse headdress badges. The Other Ranks are wearing white lanyards over their right shoulders.  The Sergeant in the middle of the rear row is wearing a signalers qualification badge above his rank chevrons and ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badges denoting his proud service in the former King’s Colonials. 
 
Figure 101:  A mounted Sergeant Sydney Harris of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) of the King Edward's Horse wearing Service Dress uniform with white lanyard over his left shoulder circa 1914.  Sergeant Harris is equipped with a 1908 pattern cavalry Mark 1 sword (Carole McEntee-Taylor. From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer: The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris. London: Pen and Sword, 2015).

King Edward's Horse Service Dress part 2


Figure 102:  A panel of a stereoscopic postcard of the mounted section of King Edward’s Horse wearing Service Dress equipped with 1908 pattern cavalry Mark 1 swords and 1903-pattern, Mounted Infantry leather 50 round .303 bandoliers for their .303 SMLE Mark 1 rifles and wear white lanyards around their left shoulders circa 1914.   
 
Figure 103: A staged photograph of signal training of a Sergeant and several Other Ranks of King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress circa 1912-13.  The Sergeant is the same one as appears in Figure 100 in which he is wearing his signallers' proficiency badge above his rank chevrons.  
 
Figure 104: Postcard of the Galloping Section of 2nd Troop, ‘C’ Squadron, (1st) King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress dated to the rear 12 January 1919. The Sergeant (second from the left, front row) and a Private (third from the left, second row) are wearing Military Medal ribbons and the Sergeant (second from the right, front row) is wearing possibly a gallantry ribbon together with several pre-Great War service medal ribbons and three service chevrons for three years overseas service on his right lower sleeve.   The 1914/1915 Star medal ribbons were first issued in December 1918 and so it is possible he is wearing one of these.  The other medal ribbons for the Great War, the British War medal and Victory medal were not issued until 1919-1920.  The Trooper (right hand end, front row) is wearing a brass wound stripe on his left outer forearm.  Note that white lanyards are no longer being worn with Service Dress uniforms. 

Additional King Edward's Horse Service Dress Photographs


Additional King Edward's Horse Service Dress Photographs
Figure 104a: Private Reginald G. Harris, Regimental Number 573, 'A' Squadron, King Edward’s Horse shown on his mount somewhere in France circa 1915-1919. Note the 1908 cavalry Mark 1 sword.  He was entitled to the 1915 Star trio of medals having arrived France & Flanders 2nd June 1915 and was discharged on the 15th Feb 1919.

King Edward's Horse Bandsman's Tunic and Gramophone Record


The King Edward's Horse bandsman's tunic was of khaki cloth with scarlet mohair lace to the collar and cuffs as per the Full Dress tunic of the Officer's and Other Ranks (Figures 104b and c).  A distinctive feature of the bandsman's tunic was the broad scarlet shoulder cords with the left adorned with a scarlet aiguillettes, terminating with metal tangs.  A pair of King Edward's Horse Regimental collar badges and King Edward's Horse brass buttons are shown on the tunic.

Figures 104b and c: The King Edward's Horse bandsman's tunic circa 1910-14 (Photographs courtesy Stephen Bosley, Bosley's auction catalogue, lot number 865, March 2008).

The band of the King Edward’s Horse as again described by Sergeant Bottle comprised 26 members: Bandmaster, eight Clarinettists, four Cornets, French Horn, Eb Clarinet, Flute, Oboe, Euphonium, Saxophone, two tenor Trombones, one Bass Trombone, Bombardon, Bass Drum, Side Drum and Cymbals.

The band of King Edward’s Horse was led by Bandmaster Skepelhorn in 1914 who became Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant and was later commissioned in the Royal Army Service Corps.

The band of King Edward's Horse made a gramophone recording of 'Popular Airs I' which was available commercially (Figure 104d).

Figure 104d: A gramophone recording of 'Popular Airs' by the band of King Edward's Horse.  

King Edward's Horse Mess Dress


King Edward's Horse Mess Dress
Officer’s Mess Dress was of a dark blue jacket with a ribbed scarlet silk rolled collar.  Additional sections provide more information as to the lapel badges worn on Mess Dress which were gilt collar badges.  The cuffs were round unlike the pointed cuffs of Full Dress and in a further change from Full Dress had four rather than five stripes of ¾ inch scarlet cloth of equal length without buttons.  Shoulder straps were in blue cloth with a single stripe again of ¾ inch scarlet cloth down the centre.  Badges of rank were in gold.  The jacket was worn with a white Marcella waistcoat and shirt with a black bow tie.  The overalls were blue with double stripes in scarlet cloth complimented by black Wellington boots (not tan as with Full Dress) and dress spurs.  
 
Figure 105: Officers and Other Ranks Mess Dress Uniforms of King Edward’s Horse 1910-24 (Reproduced with permission of Griff Morgan-Jones). 

Other Ranks Mess Dress consisted of a khaki jacket with scarlet silk roll collar upon which was worn a variation of the Regimental collar badge in gilded metal.  The cuffs were khaki and pointed with four stripes (unlike the five for Full Dress and Undress) of ¾ inch scarlet cloth without buttons and followed the shape of the cuff.  The waistcoat was khaki with three small gilt buttons was worn over a white shirt with a black bow tie.  The Mess Dress uniform was completed with khaki overalls and black Wellington boots again not tan with Full Dress.

2nd King Edward's Horse Officer's Uniform


The Officers and Other Ranks of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse wore standard cavalry pattern khaki Service uniforms with and without shoulder chains and Undress khaki uniforms.  Khaki forage caps were worn with a 2nd King Edward’s Horse Regimental headdress badge.  Box spurs and puttees were worn by Other Ranks.  As a war-raised unit, the Service Dress uniform of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse was all that was functionally required.  The Service Dress uniform was not distinct from that of the Full Dress uniform.  There are no records of Mess Dress for the 2nd King Edward’s Horse.

Figure 106a: Group photograph of the senior Officer's of Reserve Squadron of the 2nd King Edward's Horse at Kilkenny Barracks circa 1917.  A number of the Officer's are wearing shoulder chains. Brevet Colonel Harry Newman Morgan Thoyts (often mis-spelled as Thoytes), late 8th Hussars, who assumed command of the Reserve Squadron, 2nd KEH (and simultaneously Officer in Command of Kilkenny Barracks), 17/3/1917 is in the centre of the front row.  He was still in command at Kilkenny when the Lord Lieutenant, Sir John French, visited Kilkenny, 18-20/1/1919.  He is noteworthy for being the second most senior member on the sensationalised court martial of Captain J. C. Bowen-Colthurst in June 1916 for the murder of Francis Sheehy Skeffington and two others during the Easter Rebellion.  Brevet Colonel Thoyts's father was Colonel Newman Burfoot Thoyts (died 20/9/1918), The Mythe House, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire; his brother - Major Francis Gordon Grant Thoyts, 1st Battalion, Shropshire Light Infantry, Died of Wounds as a German POW, 26/8/1914 (Photograph and information from the Great War Forum).

Figure 107a:   The Officer on the left is Lieutenant Arthur Vincent Piggott, 2nd King Edward's Horse with Captain Joseph P. T. Mackesy, of 5th Battalion, Royal Munster Fusiliers at Kilkenny Barracks in 1917. Captain Mackesy had been recruiting officer for Waterford District from at least September 1913 thru April 1914, and took over duties as recruiting officer for Kilkenny District (in Kilkenny Barracks) as of at least late August 1914, and remained there until invalided out of the Army, 5/3/1918, due to ill-health and granted rank as honorary Major. He was from Carmel, Tramore, Co. Waterford, but the family owned over 1000 acres in South Kilkenny, and Joseph was an alumnus of Kilkenny College. Father - Dr. G.I. Mackesy, JP,  of Lady Lane, Waterford (died September 1917).  (Photograph and information Great War Forum).

Figure 108a: Group photograph of the Officer's of Reserve Squadron of the 2nd King Edward's Horse including Lieutenant Arthur Vincent Piggott (left in the rear row) at Kilkenny Barracks circa 1917 (Photograph and information Great War Forum.

2nd King Edward's Horse Uniform


2nd King Edward's Horse Uniform 2nd King Edward's Horse Uniform
Figure 106: A photograph of a Trooper of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress with shoulder chains and cloth leggings on his wedding day circa 1915.   He is wearing a 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badge (Peter Nemaric collection).

Figure 107: A photograph of Troopers Ford, Poulain, Saunders and an un-named Trooper (left to right) of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress.  They are wearing shoulder chains, white lanyards around their left shoulders, cloth leggings and 1903 pattern leather webbing.   They are wearing 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badges and shoulder titles.  Trooper Ford is wearing a good conduct stripe on his left forearm (Simon Jervis collection).
 

Badge Manufacture


The headdress badges of the King’s Colonials and later as King Edward’s Horse (the ‘Regiment’) have been extensively copied.  The Regiment was a volunteer unit and the uniforms, headdress and collar badges were all privately purchased and are of a superior quality and finish.  Copies of the Regimental headdress badges although generally of an inferior quality and finish can be difficult to distinguish from an original badge without experience.  This is especially the case when looking at badges offered for sale on the internet where the images may not show the fine details particularly well.  There is no real substitute for having the actual badge in your hand for close-up examination under a magnifying loop.  To date the Regiment’s collar badges and shoulder titles do not appear to have been copied.  All the examples of collar badges and shoulder titles examined to date have been of a high quality and lacking imperfections in their finish and loop attachment that commonly occur when badges are copied.  Anecdotally, the collar badges and shoulder titles unlike headdress badges are much harder to find being offered for sale, consistent with them not having been copied.  Purchasing headdress badges of the Regiment without provenance and/or from other than a reputable dealer without close inspection is not recommended unless you are buying a copy knowing it is a copy perhaps to use as a representative gap filler.

A significant problem with authenticating headdress badges to the Regiment is to determine what are correct reference sets of genuine badges to compare them with.  It is possible that pattern cards exist (or existed) for the badges of the Regiment.  Figure 108 shows a collection of the Regiment’s headdress and collar badges from the J. R. Gaunt & Son Ltd Pattern book circa 1904.  This set was sold a number of years ago by John Burridge Military Antiques, Australia.  These headdress badges have a distinctive gilt finish and are Officer’s badges except for the later King Edward’s Horse headdress badge (bottom left hand corner) which was worn by Other Ranks.  The collar badge in the top left hand is also an Officer’s gilt badge whereas the collar badge towards the centre is gilding metal and is assumed to be an Other Rank’s collar badge.  This set was originally sold at auction in the United Kingdom in 2011 by auctioneers Dixon Noonan Webb.

Figure 108: A collection of King’s Colonials and King Edward’s Horse headdress and collar badges from the J. R. Gaunt & Son Ltd. Pattern book (Photograph courtesy of John Burridge Military Antiques, Australia).

A collection of the Regiment’s headdress and collar badges and shoulder titles was donated by R. C. Whittock to the National Army Museum (Figure 109) and were described in an article by him (R. C. Whittock: The Military Historical Society, XVII: 61-65, 1967).  These badges also have a distinct gilt finish or yellow brass finish.

Figure 109: A collection of King’s Colonials and King Edward’s Horse headdress, collar badges and shoulder titles donated by R. C. Whittock to the National Army Museum (Photograph courtesy of Griff Morgan-Jones).

Several of the King’s Colonials headdress and collar badges in the authors collection were part of a display set of badges manufactured but not marked by Firmin of London.  To date the only other maker ascribed, genuine Regimental headdress or collar badges that have been noted are the first pattern King Edward’s Horse headdress badge (annotated as number 14) made by the Goldsmiths and Silversmiths and Co. London in the collection of W. Y. Carman (a respected author and authority on British badges and military uniforms), illustrated in Figure 110 and the King Edward's Horse Officers round pattern headdress badge in bronze shown in Figures 353-354 marked with Jennens & Co London.  Given that the Regiment was predominantly based in London in addition to Firmin; and Goldsmiths and Silversmiths it is likely that the suppliers of their badges may include J. R. Gaunt & Son; Bent & Parker and Jennens & Co.

Figure 110:  The W. Y. Carman collection of King’s Colonials and King Edward’s Horse headdress and collar badges with the annotations of R. J. Smith (R. J. Smith collection).

Identification


Identification Identification
One of the most extensive collections of Australian military badges was amassed by Bob Gray from 1927 and donated to the Army Museum of South Australia in the 1980s.  This collection contained several King’s Colonials and later King Edward’s Horse headdress and collar badges, a shoulder title and buttons.      

Figure 111: The Bob Gray collection of King’s Colonials and King Edward’s Horse headdress and collar badges, shoulder titles and buttons (Photograph courtesy of a Sydney collector). 

The determination that a King’s Colonials headdress badge is genuine example requires a thorough examination of the badge.  The characteristics that can be used to help determine if a King’s Colonials headdress badge is genuine or a copy are the metal finish of the badge; the sharpness of the badge details; the type and position of the fastening loops; the appearance of the solder used to braze the loops to the rear of the badge; and the size and weight of the badge.  The key characteristic is the relative sharpness of the finely detailed features on the badge.  The sizes and weights of badges are not stated in this analysis as to retain key information which may otherwise allow for more accurate copying of badges.  It should not be understated that these characteristics are only a guide and are by no means definitive or exhaustive.

The headdress and collar badges of the King’s Colonials were manufactured by either die-striking sheet brass using male (rear side) and female (front side) dies or by die-casting with a single female die.  Die-struck badges have detail present on both the front and rear surfaces of the badge whereas die-cast badges have detail only on the front of the badge with a semi-flat or flat back.

Copies of the headdress badges of the King’s Colonials have been made using the genuine manufacturing dies or copies of them.  A female die for the Australasian Squadron headdress badge (see later section) was noted as having sold on an electronic auction site and this die was marked with the badge maker’s name of Lambourne Birmingham.

Figure 112: Copy of an Australasian Squadron badge (left) produced from a copy of a female manufacturing die marked Lambourne Birmingham (right) sold on an electronic auction site. 

This is a spurious mark as badge making dies were not maker marked.  Over time the surface of the dies becomes worn through continued striking and so copy badge have less well-defined lines and blurred edges to the detailed features on the badges on both die-struck and die-cast copies.  Some die-struck copies lack the voids present on genuine badges to the extent that some of the poorest copies have no voids at all.

As was the practice with many other Regiments, Officer’s badges and buttons of the King’s Colonials have a gilt (gold wash) finish whereas Other Ranks were manufactured in brass or gilding metal.  Other Rank’s headdress and collar badges of the King’s Colonials were initially made using yellow-brass replaced over time with gilding metal.  Yellow-brass is the term used to describe badges made with 67% copper and 33% zinc.  Gilding metal was defined in the British Army Dress Regulations of 1904 as being eight parts copper to one part zinc (War Office: Dress Regulations for the Officers of the Army (Including the Militia). London: HMSO, 1904. Gilt badges are a rich golden colour whereas gilding metal badges are a duller gold colour.

The identification of headdress badges is based upon the use of Arthur L. Kipling and Hugh L. King’s ‘Headdress Badges of the British Army. Volume I; up to the end of the Great War’ (Frederick Muller Ltd., London, 1978) and follows the numbering system commonly attributed to them for example as KK xxxx.  Collar badges are referenced against Colin Churchill and Ray Westlake’s ‘British Army Collar Badges’ (London: Arms & Armour Press Limited, 1986) and similarly follows their numbering system as Churchill and Westlake Ref No xxx. Shoulder titles are referenced against Ray Westlake’s ‘Collecting Metal Shoulder Titles’ (London: Leo Cooper, 1969) as Westlake Ref No xxx. Buttons are referenced against Howard Ripley’s ‘Buttons of the British Army, 1855-1970: An illustrated guide for collectors’ (London: Arms & Armour Press, 1979) and Howard Ripley's and Denis Darmanin’s ‘Yeomanry Buttons 1830-2000’ (The Military History Society Special Number 2005) as Ripley and Darmanin Ref No xxx.

As a unit, the King’s Colonials did not see service in the Second Boer War, however, most references on military badge dealer sites refer to their headdress badges as being Boer War slouch hat badges.  The Colonial unit links to the Boer War provide a misleading connotation.

Authentification


One of the key considerations with determining whether a King’s Colonial headdress badge is genuine or not is in relation to what type of loops it has.  The loops used to fasten the King’s Colonials badges to the uniform on genuine badges were made of copper wire and were brazed onto the back of the badge by hand.  These loops have a shank with an end which has the same or only marginally greater, cross-sectional area as the shank itself.

Figure 113 shows a selection of different loops used in the manufacture of badges by J. R. Gaunt & Sons in London from a salesman’s catalogue circa 1904 (Rob Miller: British and Commonwealth Badge Forum).  Several of these loops have small feet and several have no feet at all.  Copies of King’s Colonials headdress badges that have been made from the genuine dies have been finished off by brazing on loops with a different shape than the genuine loops. The loops on copy badges (Figure 114) have a broader base with a larger contact area on the rear of the badge as compared with genuine loops (Figure 114).  The loops on copies are often referred to as being footed.  The issue of knowing what is a genuine badge to use as a reference again comes into play. However, the King’s Colonials collar badges have not been copied to date and the loops on these badges were produced in the same period as would genuine headdress badges.  Close examination of thirty or so King’s Colonials collar badges reveals that none have broad-footed loops.   The conclusion which can be drawn from this is that genuine King’s Colonial headdress badges should lack broad-footed loops.

The positioning of the loops on King’s Colonials badges is another area of consideration as to this being a key feature in authenticating a badge as being genuine.  In this text in some cases, the rear of genuine badges is not shown nor is the positioning of the loops disclosed so as not to aid badges being copied and passed off as genuine examples.

The brazing solder on genuine badges was of the same basic composition of the badge with yellow-brass on earlier badges and gilding metal on later badges.  This is because the solder was made from the trimmings, filing or saw dust produced during the manufacture of badges from sheet brass.  The solder was sparingly applied to genuine badges but sufficient to hide any trace of the base of the loop.  On copy badges the solder rarely covers the footed loop especially those with more pronounced broad feet. The types of loops and solder used on genuine headdress badges is difficult to fully validate given the inherent difficulty in authenticating a genuine headdress badge as a reference.  However, the type of loop and solder used on collar badges which have not been copied serve as a surrogate for the headdress badges.  Hence, the photographs and images of King’s Colonials headdress and collar badges which follow generally include an angled view of the rear of the badge to more clearly show the loops and brazing solder.      

Figure 113: Selection of different loops used in the manufacture of badges by J. R. Gaunt & Sons in London from a salesman’s catalogue circa 1904-08 (Rob Miller: British and Commonwealth Badge Forum).  
 
Figures 114 and 115: Close-up of a footed loops (copy badge) and non-footed loops (genuine badge). 

 
Contemporary photographs serve as a guide as to what was worn and when provided of course the photographs themselves are or can be dated.  However, the quality of the strike and details of the loop positions on badges cannot be determined from photographs of them being worn unless it is an exceptionally high resolution close up portrait photograph.
 

Headdress Badges on the First Pattern Hat


Headdress Badges on the First Pattern Hat Headdress Badges on the First Pattern Hat
The 1901-05 King’s Colonials Full Dress felt hat shown in Figure 116 was unique in bearing three badges: a first pattern Regimental badge (KK 1370) on the front crown of the hat, below that a second pattern Regimental badge (KK 1371) or a unique Squadron badge (KK 1372-1376) and a second pattern Regimental badge (KK 1371) worn on the side of the hat.  This combination of badges would have been worn in gilt for Officers and in gilding metal for Other Ranks.  the only exception to this was that the Bandmaster wore a gilt lyre badge in place of both second pattern Regimental badges as noted by Hook and Knight (Journal of the Military Historical Society, 251:70-78, 2018).  

Figure 116: Close-up image of the first pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1370) above the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge (KK 1376) on the first pattern King’s Colonials Full Dress Other Ranks felt hat, Sidcup camp, 1902. 

This array of badges can be fully appreciated by examining Figure 117 which is a photograph of the bush hat worn by King George V’s (Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment) in 1911. This bush hat is adorned with three gilt badges; a first pattern Regimental badge and two second pattern Regimental badges. This combination of badges would have been worn by Officers of the Regimental (Headquarters) staff.

Squadron headdress badges were worn by both Officers and Other Ranks of the Squadrons.
 
Figure 117:  The bush hat worn by King George V adorned with three King’s Colonials headdress badges circa 1911 © National Army Museum, Accession Number, NAM. 1963-05-3-1.

First Pattern Regimental Headdress Badge - Genuine


The first pattern Regimental headdress badge is in the form of the complete arms of His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales (St Edward's Crown) above his motto Ich Dien (I serve), above a title scroll reading "The King’s Colonials" (KK 1370) in gilt for Officers and gilding metal for Other Ranks.  This badge was only worn at the top of the first pattern Regimental felt hat from 1902-1904.  An interesting observation about this badge is that it is adorned with St Edward's Crown and motto which is appropriate as the Prince of Wales was the Honorary Colonel  of the King's Colonials, however, several badge reference sources incorrectly describe it as being the Queen Victoria Crown and hence the wrong period for a post-1902 badge.  

A genuine example of the first pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1370) is shown in Figures 118-120.  It is a die-struck Officer’s headdress badge in gilt with copper loops positioned east-west without broad feet.  The badge retains a fair amount of its genuine gilt finish and it is a very crisp strike with sharp details to all the features with no blurring of the margins of the garter strap letters.

Figures 118-120: A genuine first pattern Regimental King’s Colonials Officer’s headdress badge in gilt with non-footed loops (KK 1370) worn 1902-1904.  

First Pattern Regimental Headdress Badge - Copy


Figures 121-123: A copy of the first pattern Regimental King’s Colonials headdress badge in gilding metal and bearing footed loops (KK 1370). 

Additional copies are noted with a non-voided final curl of the unicorn’s tail.

First Pattern Regimental Headdress Badges - Genuine versus a Copy


First Pattern Regimental Headdress Badges - Genuine versus a Copy First Pattern Regimental Headdress Badges - Genuine versus a Copy
A characteristic feature of a genuine King’s Colonial first pattern Regimental Officer’s or Other Rank’s headdress badge is that they have a complete void between the unicorn’s back and tail.  This complete void can be seen in the comparison of a close-up images (Figures 124 and 125) of the genuine badge shown in Figures 118-120 and a copy in Figure 121-123.  The complete void is also clearly visible in the photograph of the badge in KK 1370 and in the collections shown in Figures 108-111.  A genuine badge is illustrated in Kipling and King and John Gaylor's Military Badge Collecting' (Pen and Sword Books, London, 1971) but a copy with the incomplete void is shown in Peter D. Athawes's 'Yeomanry Wars - The History of the Yeomanry, Volunteer and Volunteer Association Cavalry: A Civilian Tradition from 1794', (Scottish Cultural Press, Aberdeen, 1994).

Figures 124 and 125: Close-up of the non-voided and voided areas between the body and tail of the unicorn of a genuine (from Figure 118, upper image) and a copy (Figure 121, lower image) first pattern Regimental King’s Colonials headdress badge (KK 1370).  The superior quality of the strike of the genuine badge as compared with the copy is apparent from the sharp definition of the lines across the lion’s chest and in the links of the chain.

There are clear differences in size and weight between genuine and copies of the first pattern Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge. White metal versions of the first pattern Regimental headdress badge and all of the other King’s Colonials headdress badges are known copies.

The first pattern Regimental headdress badge was only worn in the period 1901-05 on the first pattern Full Dress felt hat and the newly introduced khaki Service Dress cap. The first pattern Regimental headdress badge was superseded in 1905 with the introduction of replacement forms of headdress, a second pattern Full Dress bush hat and the Service Dress cap.  The badges on these forms of headdress were either the second Regimental pattern headdress badge for Regimental Officers and Squadron headdress badges for the Officers and Other Ranks of the Squadrons.  

The first pattern Regimental headdress badge at least in numerical terms would be expected to be the least abundant given the short date range it was worn together with the limited numbers of Regimental Officers who would have worn it.   

Second Pattern Regimental Headdress Badge


Second Pattern Regimental Headdress Badge
The second pattern Regimental headdress badge bears the 'KC' cypher surmounted by Prince of Wales’s plumes and coronet all resting on a tri-part scroll inscribed “Regi Adsumus Coloni” (Colonials venturing for the King) (KK 1371).  This badge was worn beneath the first pattern Regimental badge on the front and the turned-up, left brim of the first pattern Full Dress felt hat by Officer’s of the Regimental Headquarters staff from 1901 to 1905.  It was also worn on the front of the Undress uniform first pattern forage cap from 1901 to 1905 by Officers of the Regimental Headquarters staff as shown in Figure 126.  

From 1905, the second pattern Regimental headdress badge was worn on the turned-up side of the second pattern Full Dress bush hat and on the front of the Undress second pattern peaked service cap by Officers of the Regimental Headquarters Staff.

In 1909-10, when the Squadron badges were abandoned as the Dominion associations and designations were lost (as noted in the section on the Regimental history), they were said to have been replaced by the second pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) on the Full Dress bush hat and Undress peaked service cap.  The photographic evidence, however, supports that the Squadron badges were worn up until the Regiment became the King Edward's Horse in 1910 and King Edward's Horse headdress badges were worn from that time onward.

Kipling and King state that the second pattern Regimental badge (KK 1371) was made in gilt, bronze, and gilding-metal and in two sizes.  The reference to two sizes is of interest.  Kipling and King noted that the second pattern Regimental badge worn on the upturned side of the Full Dress headdress was smaller than the one worn on the front of the headdress and that this smaller version of the badge was worn on the front of the Undress forage and peaked caps.  To date, no examples of different sizes of genuine examples of this badge have been identified.  The Officer's pouch badge is, however, a small version of this badge as can be seen in Figure 316 and it could have been this smaller sized badges which Kipling and King were referring to.  

Although second pattern Regimental badges are generally found in gilt for Officer’s and gilding metal for Other Rank’s, I have in my own collection a genuine example in bronze (see Figures 126a-b). This bronze badge would have been for wear with the Officer's Service Dress uniform. Contemporary photographs of these badges being worn do not show darkened badges as would have been observed if the badges were bronzed. Bronzed collar badges are known from the Colin Churchill collection (see later section) and these were thought to be for Officer’s Service Dress but again no photographic evidence of them being worn has been identified.

Figure 126: Close-up image from the group photograph in Figure 58 of the second pattern, Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) being worn on the Undress peaked cap with matching collar badges by the Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant of the King’s Colonials circa 1905 (Peter Nemaric collection).

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Service Dress Headdress Badge - Genuine


Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Service Dress Headdress Badge - Genuine Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Service Dress Headdress Badge - Genuine
A genuine second pattern Regimental Officer’s headdress badge in die-cast bronze for wear with Officer's Service Dress is shown in Figures 126a-126b.  It has three blades, one placed vertically behind the centre of the Prince of Wales’s plumes and the other two positioned east-west at the ends of the Regimental motto scroll consistent with the loop positions on a genuine gilding metal Officer's and Other Ranks headdress badges.  This is the only example of an OSD pattern headdress badge to the King's Colonials I have seen.  There are King's Colonials Squadron collar badges also in bronze as OSD collar badges shown later on this website and it is likely that these badges were produced for wear as part of Officer's Service Dress but no photographic evidence of the badges being worn has been identified to date.

Figures 126a-126b:  A genuine second pattern Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge for Officer's Service Dress (as per KK 1371) in die-cast bronze with three blades.  

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Headdress Badge - Genuine


The first of two different examples of genuine second pattern Regimental Officer’s headdress badges in gilding metal is shown in Figures 127-129.  The first badge is gilt and is die cast with a semi-flat back.  It has three loops with one behind the centre of the Prince of Wales’s plumes and the other two positioned east-west at the ends of the Regimental motto scroll.  The pinched loops are also gilt and lack feet.  This badge was part of a display set made by Firmin of London.

Figures 127-129:  A genuine second pattern Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) in semi-cast gilding metal with three pinched gilding metal loops.  

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Headdress Badge - Additional Genuine Example


The second of the two different examples of genuine second pattern Regimental Officer’s headdress badges are shown in Figures 130-132.  The first badge is gilt and is die-cast with a solid, flat back.  It has three loops with one behind the centre of the Prince of Wales’s plumes and the other two east-west at the ends of the Regimental motto scroll.  The loops are also gilt and lack feet.  

Figures 130-132:  A genuine second pattern Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) in die-cast, gilding metal with three gilding metal loops.  

All the second pattern Regimental badges that have established as genuine Officer’s or Other Rank’s headdress badges over the past ten years have been of the same size, loop positioning and gilt finish as the badges shown in Figures 122-129 and 130-132.

Second Pattern Regimental Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine


A die-struck example of the King’s Colonials second pattern Regimental Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1371) is shown in Figures 133-135. This badge is a genuine example of the headdress badge worn by Other Ranks of the Regimental Staff in gilding metal with three copper loops positioned as per the Officer’s headdress badges.  The loops lack feet and the badge is a fine strike to the front and rear with the motto lettering sharp and crisp.
 
Figures 133-135: A genuine second pattern Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) worn by Other Ranks of the Regimental Staff in die struck, gilding metal with three copper loops.  

Second Pattern Regimental Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


A copy the King’s Colonials second pattern Regimental Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1371) is shown in Figures 136-138. Interestingly, this copy has three non-footed loops positioned as per a genuine example. This badge is a poor strike relative to a genuine badge lacking the detail especially with the lettering of the motto.  Another characteristic of poorer copies of this badge are the quality of the void at the base of the Prince of Wales feathers with voided/cut away area between the feather quills being irregular in shape and instead of being between the quills on the genuine example it cuts into the quills on poor copies.

Figures 136-138:  A copy of the second pattern Other Ranks Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) in die struck, gilding metal with three loops.

Second Pattern Regimental Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Additional Copy


An additional gilding metal copy the King’s Colonials second pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) is shown in Figures 139-140.  This copy has only the two lower loops which are positioned east-west and lacks the third loop normally positioned behind the Prince of Wales' feathers.  These loops again lack broad feet. This copy badge is also a poor strike lacking the detail of the genuine badges especially with the lettering of the motto.  
   
Figures 139-140:  A copy of the second pattern Other Ranks Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) in die struck, gilding metal with only two loops.  

A further gilding metal copy the King’s Colonials second pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) is shown in Figure 141. This copy has a slider fitted to the rear behind the Prince of Wales' feathers. Sliders were not fitted to any genuine King's Colonials headdress badges.

Figure 141:  Rear view of a copy of the second pattern Other Ranks Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (KK 1371) in die struck, gilding metal fitted with slider. 

Examination of a considerable number of genuine examples and copies of the second pattern Regimental headdress badge has established that the quality of the strike is a reliable characteristic to consider in authenticating these badges. Notwithstanding this there are clear differences between genuine and copies of the second pattern Regimental Other Ranks headdress badges in terms of weight, size and in some cases the number and positioning of the loops or sliders. Many copies have broad footed loops as an obvious characteristic of a poor copy.

 

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Bullion Headdress Badge


Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Bullion Headdress Badge Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Bullion Headdress Badge
Shown in Figure 142 is a second pattern, Staff Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonials embroidered regimental badge in gold on a scarlet ground with garter-blue scrolls.  This badge was worn from 1904-1910 on the Sombrero hat as shown in Figure 142a. There is some mothing to the red felt of this badge.  The wearing of bullion badges for yeomanry regiments of the Edwardian period is well documented.  

Figure 142:  An example of a genuine embroidered second pattern, Staff Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (in the style of KK 1371).
 

Figure 142a:  The embroidered second pattern, Staff Officer’s Regimental King’s Colonial headdress badge (in the style of KK 1371) on the second pattern Sombrero hat (Keith Hook and David Knight: The Badges, Titles and Buttons of King Edward’s Horse. Journal of the Military Historical Society. 251:70-78, 2018. 

Background


Background Background
On the hat-band of the first pattern, tall-felt hat introduced in 1901 and worn until 1905, all Squadron members wore a distinctive Squadron headdress badge. These are perhaps best appreciated in Figure 143 which is a plate from The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades Association Bulletin from 1948.  This plate illustrates the headdress badges of the Squadrons as: ‘A’ (British Asian) elephant; ‘B’ Squadron (British American) beaver; ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) kangaroo which is the later headdress badge replacing the first pattern Australasian kangaroo and New Zealand fern badge when it was a combined Australian and New Zealand Squadron; and the ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge and later fern badge of the 3rd New Zealand Troop of ‘D’ Squadron.  These Squadron headdress badges are covered in more detail in a later section.  The Squadron badges were on the front of the second pattern Regimental Full Dress Sombrero hat from 1905-1910.  They were also worn on the Undress uniform first and second pattern cap from 1901-1910.

Figure 143:  Plate from The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades' Association Bulletin. Number 15: 1948.
 
The King’s Colonials group photograph (Figure 144) shows five of the different Squadron headdress badges being worn, many with matching pairs of collar badges.  All the headdress and collar badges in this photograph appear to be gilt or yellow-brass.  Close-up images of this group photograph have been used to illustrate each set of Squadron headdress and collar badges unless otherwise indicated.

The King’s Colonials Squadron headdress and collar badges are arguably among some of the most iconic and emblematic badges worn within the British Dominions.  The choice of native animals as icons of the senior members of the Dominions was fitting as the members of the King’s Colonials were recruited from Dominion residents in Great Britain amidst the patriotic fervour evoked by the Second Boer War.
 
Figure 144:  A group of Officers and Other Ranks from all of the different Squadrons of the King’s Colonials Imperial Yeomanry showing the second pattern Forage Cap in khaki with a white cap cover circa 1906-07.  The Officer, second from left in the middle row is denoted as a Field Officer as he bears gold braid to the peak of his forage cap.  Captain Sir Hamar Greenwood (later Viscount Greenwood), ‘B’ Squadron (British American) is third from the left in the rear row holding a cane (Peter Nemaric collection).


British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge - Original


British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge - Original British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge - Original
The Squadron badges as described by Kipling & King with their badge reference number were as follows:

‘Depicted a large (Asian, short-eared) Elephant with a palm-tree background and a scroll at the base inscribed British Asian, the two words divided by a star and crescent.  In brass’ (KK 1373).

The ‘A’ Squadron headdress badge is shown being worn with matching collar badges in Figure 145.

Figure 145:  Close-up image of the ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1373) and matching collar badges being worn by Squadron Sergeant Major C. H. Crooke circa 1905-1909.

A photograph of the front of a genuine ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge is shown in Figure 146.  This badge has loops which lack feet and they are uniquely positioned.  This badge is made of yellow-brass and it is a die-struck with crisp detail on the front and back.
 
Figure 146:  A genuine ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1373) in gilding metal.

There are three distinct irregularly-shaped voids between the bottom of elephant’s stomach and the tops of the trees.  These three voids are often not present on poorer quality copies which have been incompletely struck from the old dies.  The lines on the elephant’s body and detailed folds where the ear meets the head are sharp and clearly defined on the genuine badge but are blurred and less-well defined on the copy in Figures 147-149 and on additional copies.  There are also a pair of curved skin folds on the left-hand side of the belly of the elephant on the genuine badge which are absent on the copies.  Poorer quality copies also do not have a distinct void between the elephant’s tail and its hindquarters. The stars at the ends of the scroll are also very distinct on genuine badges and are less angular on poorer quality copies.

British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge - Copy




A significant distinction between the genuine badge in Figure 149 and the copy in Figures 150-152 and on additional copies is the positioning of the loops.  On this copy they are incorrectly positioned relative to genuine examples of this Squadron headdress badge.  Although the loop represented in the single close up image lacks broad feet the furthest loop on the rear angular image has broad feet as do the majority of copies.   Another readily identifiable feature on copies of the ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) headdress badge is that the tip of the elephant’s trunk is not voided where it curls back up towards the head.  On the genuine badge in Figure 149 the trunk is voided.  

Figures 150-152:  A copy of an ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1373) in gilding metal. 

 The non-voided trunk, positioning of the loops and differences in the weight and sizes can all be used to differentiate between genuine and copies of the ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) headdress badge.  


British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge - Additional Copy


British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge -  Additional Copy British Asian Squadron Headdress Badge -  Additional Copy
An additional copy shown in Figures 152-153 is marked to the rear as being silver, which it is not, and has blades as to suggest it is an Officer’s headdress badge.  
 
Figure 152-153:  An additional copy of an ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) headdress badge (KK 1373) in white metal and marked silver to the reverse and fitted with attaching blades.

An ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) headdress badge in white metal with east-west loops and a non-voided tail has also been noted.  It was sold as a commemorative badge and is also a copy.

British American Squadron Headdress Badge - genuine


British American Squadron Headdress Badge - genuine British American Squadron Headdress Badge - genuine
‘A beaver with a maple-leaf background and a scroll at the base British American. Officers and senior NCOs in gilt, Other Ranks’ in brass’ (KK 1374).

The ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks’ headdress badge is shown being worn with matching collar badge(s) in Figure 154 and by several senior NCOs in Figure 155.

Figure 154: Close-up image of the ‘B’ Squadron (British American) headdress (KK 1374) and matching collar badge(s) circa 1905.  Taken from group photograph in Figure 144 (Peter Nemaric collection).

Figure 155: A group of King’s Colonials Regimental Staff Officers and ‘B’ (British American) Squadron Officers and senior NCOs circa wearing Undress uniforms with second pattern forage caps circa 1905-06.  The Officer second from the left in the second row is a Field Officer as he bears gold braid to the peak of his forage cap.  Regimental Sergeant Major Fegan is stood at the rear, second from the right wearing his Khedive Star and Egypt medals.   Sergeant Sydney Harris is seated at the front right.  He and the Sergeant to his left are both wearing cloth marksman's badges on their lower left sleeve (Peter Nemaric collection).

British American Squadron Officer's Headdress Badge - genuine


British American Squadron Officer's Headdress Badge - genuine British American Squadron Officer's Headdress Badge - genuine
Figures 156-157 shows a genuine ‘B’ Squadron Officer’s headdress badge in semi die-cast gilt with three blades remaining from the two sets of attaching blades at the rear of the badge.  One set is located at the base of the maple leaf and the other at the ends of the title scroll. The edges of the maple leaves on this badge are sharp and finish at distinct points and the vein details are very crisp.
 
Figures 156-157:  A genuine example of a ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1374) in gilt with three of the four original blades to the rear. 

British American Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine


British American Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine British American Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine
A genuine example of the ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks headdress badge is shown in Figures 158-159.  This is a brass badge which has been modified to have a large rectangular belt or pouch fitting, made of brass, attached to the back of the badge.  The stumps of the genuine east-west loops are still clearly visible with a small footprint consistent with a loop which lacked broad feet.  The badge is a fine strike to the front and rear with the high points having been polished on this coppery-brass example.    
 
Figures 158-159:  A genuine example of a ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks’  headdress badge (KK 1374) in brass modified with the addition of a pouch or belt fitting.  The stumps of the genuine loops are still present in an east-west orientation.

British American Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


The 'B' Squadron (British American) Other Ranks' headdress badge in Figures 160-162 is an example of an additional copy badge with east-west positioned loops which lack feet.  It is made from darkened yellow-brass.
 
Figure 160-162:  A copy of a ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1374) in darkened brass with east-west loops without feet.

British American Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Additional Copy


Figures 163-165: Another copy of a ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1374) in toned brass with north-south loops with broad feet. 

Copies of the ‘B’ Squadron headdress badge have broader, less well-defined veins on the leaves which lack pointy finishes to the edges and loops with broad feet.  There are notable size differences between genuine and copies of the 'B' Squadron headdress badges.

Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine


‘A kangaroo on a rising-sun with a fern-leaf in the foreground and a scroll at the base inscribed Australasian.  In brass’ (KK 1376).

The ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge is shown in Figure 166 which is a close-up image from the King’s Colonials group photograph.  Several of these Squadron badges are also shown being worn in another group photograph of the King’s Colonials in Figure 80.  In these photographs, the ‘C’  Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge appears to be in yellow-brass or gilding metal.

Figure 166: Close-up image of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge (KK 1376) being worn circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure 80.

The Australasian Squadron headdress badge was worn from 1901 and appears in several photographs of the King’s Colonials at that date.  There are notes in several publications as to this King’s Colonials badge being the first depiction of the rising sun motif on a badge associated with the Australian Military Forces. This is, however, not correct, as it has been established by Lieutenant Colonel Vernon that Lieutenant H.J. Cox Taylor was the first Staff Officer of the Australian Rifles in 1897 and he designed their badge and it used the rising sun as a backdrop to the crown to symbolise that ‘The Sun Rising Over the Crown of The Empire on Which It Never Sets’ (Sabretache: Journal of the Australian Military Historical Society, 7:21-23, October, 1959).  Lieutenant Cox Taylor subsequently submitted the rising sun and crown as a design of the badge for the newly formed Australian Commonwealth Horse in January 1902 following Australia’s Federation in 1901. The design was accepted and it once re-drawn it became the badge of the Australian Imperial Forces.

A genuine ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks headdress badge is shown in Figures 167 and 168. This badge has very clear fine details to the front and rear (not shown) of the badge from a quality strike in yellow-brass and non-footed loops with brazing solder of the same tone as the rear of the badge.

Figures 167 and 168: A genuine ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks' headdress badge (KK 1376) in gilding metal with east-west, non-footed loop(s). 

Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


The first of three copies of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge is shown in Figures 169-171. Compared with the genuine badge in Figures 167-168, the copy badge in gilding metal lacks the fine lines on the sun’s rays and leaves.  The background of the Australasian scroll is seeded on the front but the seeding does not carry through in the striking to the rear of the badge.  The blackened brass headdress badge shown in Figures 172-174 is die struck and has footed loops in an east-west orientation.  This badge is also a copy.  An additional copy is shown in Figure 175-177 and this badge has north-south loops which interestingly lack feet.  The sun’s rays are quite flat in relief on this copy.

Figure 169-171: A copy of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1376) in gilding metal with east-west, footed-loops.

Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Additional Copy


Figure 172-174: An additional copy of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks' headdress badge (KK 1376) in darkened metal with footed, east-west loops. 

Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Further Copy


Figures 175-177: A further copy of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1376) in brass with footed, north-south loops. 

Differentiating Genuine and Copies of the Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge


Differentiating Genuine and Copies of the Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge Differentiating Genuine and Copies of the Australasian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge
The ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge is one of the most difficult to authenticate among the King’s Colonials badges.  In the late 1970's copies of this badge first really became apparent to collectors in Australia mainly as a result of the increased numbers of examples appearing on dealer's mail order lists and at militaria shows.  An article by K.R. White from 1980 notes that copies of this badge were of a copper gold irregular colour relative to the light gold finish of die-struck genuine badges (Sabretache: Journal of the Australian Military Historical Society, 21 (3):14-15, July-September, 1980).  Although die-struck the copy in the article lacked the fine detail of the genuine and was of a different size.  

As with all King's Colonials headdress badges the quality of the strike is very good guide to whether the badge is genuine or not as is the position of the loops and their lack of feet.  As noted on the first of three copies the lack of seeding is a characteristic of the badge not being genuine.  Collectively these are important characteristics that can be used to help differentiate between a copy and a genuine ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge.  However, the most readily identifiable and reliable feature on a genuine example are the fingers on the front paws of the kangaroo which can clearly be seen in Figure 178 (left image) as individual fingers versus the copy below in Figure 179 (right image) with clubbed and indistinguishable fingers.  

Figure 178, left image:  Close-up image of the fine detail of the front paw of the kangaroo of the genuine 'C' Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge.

Figure 179, right image:  Close-up image of the lack of fine detail of the clubbed front paw of the kangaroo of the copy 'C' Squadron (Australasian) headdress badge.

British African Officer's Headdress Badge - Genuine


An ostrich with a background of mountains and a scroll at the base inscribed British African.  In gilt, bronze and brass finish (KK 1372).

The headdress badge worn by ‘D’ Squadron (British African) is shown in the close-up image (Figure 180) taken from the group photograph of King’s Colonials (Figure 144).

Figure 180: Close-up image of the ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge (KK 1372) worn by the Squadron Sergeant Major.

The headdress badge shown in Figure 181 is a genuine Officer’s headdress badge from the Firmin display set. It is a die struck badge in rich gilt with loops also in gilt positioned east-west which lack feet.
 
Figures 181-182: Front and rear of a genuine ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1372) in gilt. 

British African Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


The ‘D’ Squadron Other Ranks' headdress badge shown in Figures 183-185 is a copy.  The strike of the badge is relatively good, however, at least one of the loops has prominent feet.  

Figures 183-185: A copy of a ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1372) in gilding metal with footed, east-west loops.

Copies of the 'D' Squadron headdress badge typically are a poor strike with a lack of the fine lines around the eye and neck.  The majority of copies have footed loops. There are notable differences in size and weight between original and copies.

New Zealand Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine


‘E’ Squadron – (an entirely New Zealand Squadron).  A fern-leaf inscribed with the letters NZ.  In brass (KK 1377).

The silver fern headdress badge first appears in photographs of the Kings’ Colonials at their annual camp in St. Albans in the summer of 1904.  In 1903 an attempt to create an entirely New Zealand ‘E’ Squadron proved unsuccessful due to insufficient numbers of New Zealanders being recruited. By the summer of 1904, the New Zealanders constituted the 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African).  

The ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) headdress badge is shown being worn in Figure 186.

Figure 186:  Close-up image of the ‘E’ (New Zealand) Squadron and later 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) headdress badge (KK 1377) being worn by a Trooper at annual camp in 1904. 

Figures 187-188 shows a genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) Other Ranks’ headdress badge which is die struck in yellow-brass.  There are prominent full stops after the letters N and Z and the veins on the silver fern leaf are sharp and crisp.  The copper loops are positioned east-west and are lacking feet.

Figures 187-188: A genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) and later 3rd Troop, ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1377) in gilding metal with east-west loops. 

New Zealand Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


A copy of the ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) headdress badge is shown in Figure 188-190.  This copy is a very good strike but has loops with broad feet.

Figures 188-190: A copy of an ‘E’ Squadron and later 3rd Troop, ‘D’ Squadron (Australasian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1377) in gilding metal with east-west loops.  

The ‘E’ Squadron headdress and collar badges are sometimes confused with several different patterns of fern leaf badges worn by New Zealand Volunteer Officers who formed part of the Second Boer War contingent and by New Zealand Permanent Staff.  These fern leaf badges have differently shaped leaf stems, dimensions, loop positions and some but not all patterns lack the full stops after the letters 'N' and 'Z '.  

Sydney Harris (shown in Figure 209) who joined ‘B’ Squadron (British American or Canadian) in 1905 states that because there was no special Squadron for New Zealanders (from 1904) they could wear a fern badge to indicate their Nationality.   New Zealand fern headdress and collar badges were worn by members of the 3rd Troop of ‘D’ Squadron (British African).


Australian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Genuine


A kangaroo on a scroll inscribed Australia.  In brass (KK 1375).

In 1903, upon formation of the ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand), ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) was left with an entirely Australian make-up.  It was re-named the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian).

The ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) headdress badge is shown being worn in Figure 191.
           
Figure 191: Close-up image of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) headdress (KK 1375) taken from the group photograph of mounted King’s Colonials (Figure 79) (Iain Davidson collection). 

Figures 192-193 shows an example of a genuine Other Ranks’ headdress badge.  The headdress badge is die struck in yellow-brass.  This badge has copper loops which lack feet and are positioned north-south.  The quality of the strike is very good with fine detail evident on the front and rear of the badge.

Figures 192-193: A genuine ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) Other Ranks’ headdress badge (KK 1375) in gilding metal with north-south loops. 

Australian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badge - Copy


The copy in Figures 191a-193a has a coppery appearance and is a poor quality die-struck badge with north-south loops which are footed.  The loops are often positioned east-west on copy badges.
 
Figures 191a-193a: An example of a copy of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1375) in gilding metal with north-south loops. 

Differentiating between Genuine and Copy Australian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badges


Differentiating between Genuine and Copy Australian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badges Differentiating between Genuine and Copy Australian Squadron Other Ranks' Headdress Badges
A comparison of the close-up of the head and jaw bones on the genuine badge shown in Figure 193b and the copy in Figure 194 shows them to be much broader on a genuine badge than on an example of a copy.  
   
Figure 193b-194: Close-up of a genuine example (upper) and a copy (lower) of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1375).
 
In 1909, the term "Colony Squadrons" was abolished and consequently the wearing of Squadron headdress and collar badges was to be discontinued.   All ranks were now to wear the smaller King’s Colonials second pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) on the bush-hat and the newly introduced khaki service dress cap with matching second pattern Regimental collar badges.

First Pattern Regimental Other Ranks Collar Badge


From 1901 until 1905 the Other Ranks of the King’s Colonials wore a pair of first pattern, Regimental collar badge with the letters ‘KC’ inter-twined in gilding metal.  The collar badges were worn as a non-opposing pair as shown in Figure 156 a close-up of Corporal Shaw (from Figure 56).  These collar badges are referenced by Churchill and Westlake as 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry first pattern in gilding metal (Churchill and Westlake  Ref No 114).  

Figure 195:  Close-up image of the first pattern Regimental Other Ranks collar badges of the King’s Colonials (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 114) being worn by Private Shaw circa 1905 (Peter Nemaric collection).

The collar badge shown in Figures 196-197 is die-cast gilding metal with a flat back and north-south loops.

Figures 196-197: Front and rear images of a first pattern Regimental Other Ranks collar badge of the King’s Colonials (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 114) die-cast in gilding metal (Patrick Birley collection).


First Pattern Regimental Staff Collar Badge


First Pattern Regimental Staff Collar Badge First Pattern Regimental Staff Collar Badge
In part of the Colin Churchill collection, sold by C & T Auctioneers in November 2015 there was a pair of inter-twined ‘KC’ ciphers in gilding metal with red backing cloths (Figures 198 and 199).  The red backing cloths were described as being a distinction of the collar badges worn by Regimental Staff.  It is difficult to determine with certainty from examining period photographs of the King's Colonials if the red backing cloths were actually worn by the Regimental Staff.  These collar badges would have been worn from 1901-1905.

Figures 198 and 199:  Front and rear images of a pair of first pattern Regimental Other Ranks collar badges with red backing cloths of the King’s Colonials Regimental Staff  (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 114) in gilding metal (Images reproduced with kind permission C&T Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Collar Badges


On formation in 1901 until 1910 the Officers of the King’s Colonials wore pairs of second pattern Regimental collar badges in gilt (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 115).  These collar badges are a smaller version of the second pattern, Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371) worn with the Officer’s Full Dress and Undress uniform. These collar badges bear the Prince of Wales feathers atop inter-twined the letters KC above the motto.

Figure 200: Close-up image of the second Regimental Pattern Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1371) and matching pair of collar badges from the group photograph in Figure 144.

These Officer’s gilt, collar badges are semi-die cast with a flat back apart from an indent at the bottom of the Regimental motto scroll.  One of collar badges has gilt loops and the other copper loops both positioned north-south.
 
Figures 201-202:  Font and rear images of a pair of second pattern Regimental Officer’s collar badges (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 115) semi-die cast in gilt.  

Second Pattern Regimental Officer's Collar Badges


The second pattern Regimental collar badges were also manufactured as die-struck badges in gilding metal as shown in Figures 203-204.  This pair have north-south copper loops.  Theses die-struck collar badges were worn by Other Ranks attached to the Regimental Headquarters from 1901-1910.
 
Figures 203-204: Pair of second pattern Regimental collar badges which are die struck in gilding metal (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 115) and worn by Other Ranks attached to the Regimental Staff. 

The second pattern Regimental collar badges were also worn by Officers of the Regimental Staff and those attached to the King’s Colonials Squadrons with a Squadron headdress badge on the Undress cap.  In the group photograph of the King’s Colonials yeomanry (Figure 144), the Major is wearing a ’B’ Squadron (British American) headdress badge with second pattern Regimental collar badges in the close-up image in Figure 205.

Figure 205: Close-up image of the ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1374) with a pair of second pattern Regimental Officer's collar badges being worn circa 1905.

First and Second Pattern Regimental Collar Badges


The group photograph (Figure 206) of senior NCOs and an Officer shows both first and second pattern collar badges being worn.

Figure 206: The permanent staff of the King’s Colonials as of 19th April 1902 from left to right are Regimental Sergeant Major Fezan (former 4th Dragoon Guards), Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant Palmer (former 10th Hussars); Captain and Adjutant R. R. Thompson; and Squadron Sergeant Major Thompson (former 13th Hussars) (Navy and Army Illustrated. London: Elliot & Fry, Volume XIV: Number 274, 147-148, May 3rd 1902).  

In the Colin Churchill collection there was a single die-cast, flat backed, second pattern Regimental collar badges in bronze with north-south copper loops (Figures 207-208). No photographic evidence exists as to these bronzed collar badges being worn and it is likely they were intended for wear as part of the Officer’s Service Dress (OSD) uniform.

Figures 207-208:  Front and rear images of a second pattern Regimental Officer’s collar badge in bronze with a flat back (Images reproduced with kind permission C&T Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

Squadron Collar Badges


Squadron Collar Badges Squadron Collar Badges
From 1905 until 1910, perhaps as a result in the change in title from 4th County of London (King’s Colonial) Imperial Yeomanry to King’s Colonials, all the Squadrons (British African, British American, British Asian, Australian and for short period, New Zealand and then as a Troop of the British African Squadron) of the King’s Colonials wore matching pairs of collar badges of the same design as the Squadron headdress badges.  One of the first known dated photographs (Figure 209) of matching Squadron headdress and collar badges being worn is that of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris taken in October 1905 upon his joining ‘B’ (British American) Squadron.

Figures 209 and 210:  Sergeant Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris upon joining ‘B’ Squadron (British American) taken in October 1905 with close-up image showing his ‘B’ Squadron (British American) headdress and matching collar badge(s) (Carole McEntee-Taylor: From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer: The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris. London: Pen and Sword, 2015).

The one notable exception to the wearing of matching collar badges was the Australasian Squadron. Photographs of Troopers of ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) do not show them to be wearing a collar badge modeled on the Australasian Squadron headdress badge (KK 1376). There has been no photographic evidence identified of Australasian collar badges being worn nor have any ever appeared on the market or in private or publicly available collections.  The Australasian headdress badges were either worn without collar badges or with the first pattern Regimental inter-twined KC collar badges or with Australian Squadron collar badges.

The Squadron collar badges were worn as facing pairs with the heads of the Australian kangaroo, Asian elephant, Canadian beaver and African ostrich all facing inwards.   The tips of the New Zealand Squadron fern on their collar badges face outwards.   The loops on genuine collar badges also lack broad feet.  From 1905 onward the first pattern Regimental collar badges worn by Other Ranks were replaced by Squadron collar badges of a similar pattern to the Squadron headdress badge.  The only exception to this is that the Other Ranks of the Australasian Squadron did not wear Australasian Squadron collar badges as none of these were ever produced.  The Officers continued to wear the second pattern Regimental collar badges.

'A' Squadron Collar Badges


The ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badges are shown being worn with a matching headdress badge in Figure 211.  
 
Figure 211: Close-up image of the ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1374) with a matching pair of collar badges being worn circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure 144 (Peter Nemaric collection).

A pair of 'A' Squadron (British Asian) collar badges are shown in Figures 212 and 213.  They are die struck in gilding metal with copper loops positioned east-west. There is a continuous void between the elephant’s stomach and the tree tops.  The curl of the elephant’s trunk is voided but the tail and hindquarters are not voided.  

Figures 212 and 213:  Front and rear images of a pair of ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badges (In the style of KK 1373) in gilding metal. 


'A' Squadron OSD Collar Badges


'A' Squadron OSD Collar Badges 'A' Squadron OSD Collar Badges
Again, in the Colin Churchill collection there was a die-struck ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badge in bronze with east-west copper loops (Figures 214 and 215). Similarly, no photographic evidence exists as to these bronzed collar badges being worn and it is likely they were intended for wearing as Officer’s Service Dress.
 
Figure 214 and 215:  Front and rear images of a bronzed, ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) Officer’s collar badge (Images reproduced with kind permission C&T Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

'B' Squadron Collar Badges


The ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badges are shown in Figure 216 being worn with a matching headdress badge.

Figure 216: Close-up image of the ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1374) with one of a matching pair of collar badges visible being worn circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure 144 (Peter Nemaric collection).

The ‘B’ Squadron (British American) beaver collar badges are die-struck in gilding metal with copper loops positioned north-south (Figures 217-218).
 
Figures 217-218:  An example of a pair of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badges (In the style of KK 1374) in gilding metal. One of the collar badges has had a loop broken off. 

'B' Squadron OSD Collar Badges


'B' Squadron OSD Collar Badges 'B' Squadron OSD Collar Badges
Again, in the Colin Churchill collection there was a die-struck ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badge in bronze with east-west copper loops (Figures 219 and 220).  Similarly, no photographic evidence exists of these bronzed collar badges being worn and it is likely they were intended for wearing as Officer’s Service Dress.
 
Figures 219 and 220:  Front and rear images of a bronzed ‘B’ Squadron (British American) collar badge (Images reproduced with kind permission C&T Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

'C' Squadron Collar Badges being worn


As noted previously, the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) of the King’s Colonials did not wear Australasian collar badges in the same style as the Squadron headdress badge (Figure 221).  There is no photographic evidence of such collar badges having been worn nor have any been offered for sale or observed in either private or publicly-available collections.

Figure 221: Close-up image of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1376) being worn with a pair of Australian collar badges circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure 144 (Peter Nemaric collection).

As can be seen in Figure 221, the pair of collar badges are not of the pattern of the Australasian headdress badge but are a pair of kangaroo collar badges.   These kangaroo collar badges can be attributed to ‘C’ Squadron after it had become an entirely Australian Squadron in 1904 after the New Zealanders has left to temporarily form a separate ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand).  The Australian kangaroo collar badges were then worn with the introduction of the ‘C’ (Australian) Squadron headdress badge in 1905 (Figure 222).

Figure 222: Close-up image of the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1376) with a matching pair of collar badges circa 1905 (Iain Davidson collection). 

The front of a ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badge on a later King Edward’s Horse tunic (originally shown in Figure 96) is shown in Figure 223.  

Figure 223:  A ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badge on a King Edward’s Horse tunic (In the style of KK1375) in gilding metal (Peter Nemaric collection).

'C' Squadron Collar Badges


'C' Squadron Collar Badges 'C' Squadron Collar Badges
The front and rear of a pair of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges are shown in Figure 224 and 225.  This pair of collar badges are die-struck in yellow-brass.  The right-hand collar badge has had their genuine north-south loops removed and replaced with east-west positioned loops.  Examination of another pair of collar badges has determined that these additional collar badges also have north-south loops.  Like the other Squadron collar badges, the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges are a matching pair.  In the pair shown, the kangaroo on the left-hand collar badge has a straight tail as should the right-hand collar badge which has a tail which has been accidentally bent.

The ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges are the most difficult to come by.

Figures 224 and 225:  A pair of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges (In the style of KK 1375) in gilding metal (From a Sydney collector).

Unlike bronzed OSD versions of the 'A' Squadron (British Asian), 'B' Squadron (British American) and 'E' Squadron (New Zealand) collar badges, a bronzed OSD version of the 'C' Squadron (Australian) collar badges has not been noted.

'D' Squadron Collar Badges


The ‘D’ Squadron (British African) collar badges are shown being worn with a matching headdress badge in Figure 226.  

Figure 226: Close-up image of the ‘D’ (British African) Squadron Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1372) being worn with a pair of matching collar badges circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure .

The pair of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) ostrich collar badges shown in Figures 227 and 228 are die-struck in gilding metal.  They have copper loops which lack feet and are positioned east-west.

Figures 227-228:  A pair of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) collar badges (In the style of KK 1372) in gilding metal. 

Unlike bronzed OSD versions of the 'A' (British Asian), 'B' (British American) and 'E' (New Zealand) Squadron collar badges, a bronzed OSD version of the 'D' Squadron (British African) collar badges has not been noted.

'E' Squadron Collar Badges


The collar badges of ‘E’ Squadron (British African) and /or 3rd Troop (New Zealand), ‘D’ Squadron (South African) are shown being worn with a matching headdress badge in Figure 229.

Figure 229: Close-up image of the 3rd (New Zealand) Troop, ‘D’ Squadron headdress badge (KK 1377) being worn with a pair of matching collar badges circa 1905 from the group photograph in Figure 144 (Peter Nemaric collection). 

The 3rd Troop (New Zealand), ‘D’ Squadron collar badges were worn with the tips facing outwards.  The pair of collar badges shown in Figures 300 and 301 are die-struck in gilding metal and have copper loops positioned east-west.
 
Figures 300-301:  A pair of ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) collar badges (in the style of KK 1377) in gilding metal. 

'E' Squadron Officer's Collar Badges


A striking fire-gilt ‘E’ Squadron collar badge is shown in Figures 302 and 303.  This is an Officer’s collar badge with its rich gilt finish.  The collar badge is die-cast badge with a flat back.

Figures 302 and 303:  An example of a genuine ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) collar badge (In the style of KK 1377) in fire-gilt (David Stewart collection). 

Interestingly in Figure 304, the photograph taken at annual camp in 1904 (Figure 58) shows one of the Troopers to be wearing a single New Zealand fern badge on his collar perhaps as a forerunner of the introduction of Squadron collar badges from 1905.
 
Figure 304:  A close-up image of the Trooper wearing a New Zealand fern leaf collar badge in the style of KK 1377.   

'E' Squadron Officer's OSD Collar Badges


 'E' Squadron Officer's OSD Collar Badges  'E' Squadron Officer's OSD Collar Badges
The Colin Churchill collection also contained an ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) die-cast collar badge with a flat back in bronze (Figures 305 and 306).   These bronze collar badges would follow the convention of Officer’s wearing Officers Service Dress post-1902 although again no photographic evidence of it being worn has been identified.

Figures 305 and 306:  Front and rear images of a bronzed, New Zealand second pattern Regimental Officer’s collar badge with a flat back shown with a die-struck, gilding metal example for comparison (Images reproduced with kind permission C&T Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

The Wearing of Collar Badges


The Wearing of Collar Badges The Wearing of Collar Badges
The wearing of Squadron collar badges continued beyond the change of title of the Regiment from King’s Colonials to King Edward’s Horse in 1910.  There are several photographs of members of the King Edward’s Horse wearing the former Squadron collar badges for example in Figure 307.  Additionally, the King Edward’s Horse tunic shown in Figure has a pair of the ‘C’ Squadron collar badges (KK 1376) with a King Edward’s Horse headdress badge as a NCO arm badge and KEH buttons.  

Figure 307: Close-up image of a Sergeant of King Edward’s Horse circa 1913 (from Figure 103) wearing the King Edward’s Horse headdress badge, King Edward’s Horse KEH/KODR shoulder titles and a pair of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Other Ranks collar badges of the King’s Colonials (KK 1374). 

Many of the photographs of the King’s Colonials in the period post-1905 show Troopers not to be wearing collar badges on their Service Dress tunics. The composite image shown in Figure 308 (from Figure 79) shows a Trooper of 'D' Squadron (British African), two Troopers of ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) and one Trooper from 3rd Troop (New Zealand) of 'D' Squadron.  Only one of these Troopers, one of the two from 'C' Squadron is wearing his Squadron collar badges.

The wearing of collar badges on Service Dress by the King’s Colonials became optional around 1907.  

 Figure 308: Composite image of the ‘C’ (Australian) Squadron Other Ranks headdress badges (KK 1376) being worn with and without a matching pair of collar badges taken from the King’s Colonial mounted group photograph (Figure 79) circa 1905 (Iain Davidson collection).

NCO Arm Badges - 'A' Squadron


NCO Arm Badges - 'A' Squadron
The wearing of arm badges by some Squadron Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs) of the King’s Colonials in the same pattern as the Squadron headdress badges has not been previously documented.  These badges were worn from 1901-1910 and are clearly evident in the group photograph of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Officers and Senior NCOs circa 1905-06 (Figure 155).  A photograph of Squadron Sergeant Major C. H. Crooke shows the side profile of his 'elephant' arm badge being worn above his rank chevrons on his right arm (Figure 309).  He is wearing his Sergeant Major's crown above his arm badge.  

Figure 309: Squadron Sergeant Major C. H. Cooke of ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) wearing an 'A' Squadron (British Asian) headdress pattern badge above his rank chevrons circa 1905-09.  SSM Cooke is wearing the Egypt medal (1882-1889) with a single clasp (13 possible) and the Khedive's Star (1882-1891).

NCO Arm Badges - 'B' and 'C' Squadrons


A close-up image of the Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant and the Squadron Sergeant Major from the group photograph of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Officers and Senior NCOs circa 1905-06 (Figure 155) show arm badges being worn above the rank chevrons of their right arms (Figure 309a).  The Squadron Sergeant Major wears his Sergeant Major's crown above his arm badge.  The front of these arm badges appears identical to the Squadron headdress badges.

Figure 309a: Composite image of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) Sergeant (left image) and Squadron Sergeant Major (right image) wearing 'B' Squadron (British American) headdress pattern badges above their rank chevrons as a Senior NCO arm badges taken from the group photograph in Figure 155 circa 1905-06 (Peter Nemaric collection).

Arm badges were also worn by some NCOs  in 'C' Squadron (Australasian) as can be seen in the photograph of Sergeant MacIntosh in Figure 35.   Close-up images (Figures 310 and 311) of this Squadron from a photograph at annual camp (Figure 30) shows that they were worn by the rank of Corporal and above.  
 
Figures 310 and 311: Close up images of a ‘C’ Squadron (Australasian) Sergeant and Corporal at annual camp in 1903 (from Figure 30) wearing a 'C' Squadron (Australasian) Headdress pattern badge as an NCO’s arm badge above their rank chevrons.

Photographic evidence of an arm badge being worn by an NCO from 'A' Squadron (British African) has not been identified.

NCO Arm Badges - 'D' and 'E' Squadrons


The wearing of arm badges by NCOs of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) may be evident in Figure 312.
 
Figure 312: Photograph of a group of ‘D’ Squadron (British African) Troopers at annual camp in 1904 with two Sergeants wearing what appears to be 'D' Squadron (British African) headdress pattern badges above their rank chevrons as NCO's arm badges.  The shape of the badge looks slightly different on the angle of the photograph and it may be that these are trade badges and not NCO's' arm badges.  

Figures 313-314 show an NCO's arm badge of ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) on and when removed from the tunic of Sergeant MacIntosh (Figures 63).  

The arm badge is die-struck gilding metal with non-footed loops.  It is of the same size as that of the headdress badge.    

Figures 313-314:  An NCO's arm badge of ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) from the tunic of Sergeant MacIntosh (Figures 63) with broken leaf stem.

Photographic evidence of the ‘E’ Squadron (New Zealand) arm badge actually being worn by an NCO has not been identified.

Unlike other yeomanry or cavalry senior NCO arm badges it is interesting that the King’s Colonials wore an arm badge of the same size and pattern as the headdress badge.  It is also likely that these arm badges have the same fixing loops as the headdress badge.  The tradition of cavalry and yeomanry senior NCOs wearing arm badges above or on their rank chevrons started in the late 19th century and is carried on today (Linaker, David and Dine, Gordon: Cavalry Warrant Officers And Non-Commissioned Officers Arm Badges. Military Historical Society, London 1997).

Officer's Pouch Badges


The close-up image (Figure 315) of Captain Hamar Greenwood of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) shows him wearing a pouch belt with a second pattern Regimental pouch belt badge (in the style of KK 1371) between the lion’s head holder with three chains and a whistle.
 
Figure 315: Close-up image of the pouch belt badge worn by Captain Hamar Greenwood (later Viscount Greenwood) of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) circa 1907.  His ‘B’ Squadron (British American) headdress (KK 1374) and matching collar badges can clearly be seen (Worthpoint Image).

The Officer’s and senior NCOs pouch belt, pouch and fittings are detailed in Figure 316.  The second pattern Regimental pouch belt badge was finished in gilt and was attached using three screw posts.   An exanmple is shown in Figure 316a.   The Officer’s and senior NCO’s pouch itself bore a smaller size second pattern Regimental pouch badge (in the style of KK 1371) in gilt again attached using three screw posts.  Most pouch badges are attached through the leather using screw posts as is the later King Edward's Horse pouch badge shown in Figure 368.  

Figure 316: Close-up image of the Officer's Full Dress brown brindle pouch belt and smaller pouch badge worn 1901-1910 (R. J. Smith collection).

Figure 316a: The rear of the Officer's Full Dress brown brindle pouch belt badge worn 1901-1910 (Photo courtesy of Regimental Badges).

'KC' Cypher Badge


'KC' Cypher Badge 'KC' Cypher Badge
Figures 317 and 318 show the front and rear images photographs of a cypher comprised of the entwined letters K and C.   The badge is die struck in bronze with two copper loops.  This is attributed to be a King’s Colonials badge and an example is depicted in the collection of Bob Gray (Figure 77).  It has been suggested that this badge may have been worn as an Other Ranks’ pouch badge, however, pouch belts and pouches were only worn by Officers and their pouches bore a second pattern Regimental badge as shown in the previous section.

Photographic evidence of this cypher badge being worn is required to make a definitive identification as to it being a King’s Colonial badge rather than a King’s Crown type cypher.
 
Figures 317 and 318: An example of an unknown KC cypher badge possibly attributed to the King’s Colonials.  

Gilding Metal Shoulder Titles


Shoulder titles were worn by the King’s Colonials on both Full Dress, Undress and Service Dress directly on the tunic or on shoulder chains as shown in Figure 319.  

Figure 319: Close-up image of the KC shoulder title worn by an NCO of ‘B’ Squadron (British American) from the King’s Colonial group photograph (Figure 144) circa 1905-06 (Peter Nemaric collection).

The first type of shoulder titles worn were the letters ‘KC’ in gilding metal (Figures 320 and 321).  These have loops positioned east-west which lack feet. This pattern of shoulder title is referenced, but not illustrated or numbered in Westlake under King Edward’s Horse.  This pattern of shoulder titles were worn from 1901-10.
 
Figures 320 and 321: Pair of King’s Colonials shoulder titles in gilding metal with loops. 


White Metal Shoulder titles


A white metal version of the letters ‘KC’ has also been noted (Figure 322).  This shoulder title is the same size and style of the gilding metal version and is unlikely to be a copy.  The white metal version has attaching loops positioned east-west.  It is plausible that the white metal shoulder titles were worn by the King’s Colonials for ceremonial occasions such as the Coronation of King Edward VII in August 1902.  It is difficult to distinguish between white metal and gilding metal shoulder titles in period photographs.

Figure 322: A King’s Colonials shoulder title in white metal shown with gilding metal title for comparison.

There is also a larger version of the King’s Colonials shoulder title badge again in white metal (Figures 323 and 324).  This shoulder title has separate letters attached to two bars with north-south loops but closely resembles the pattern of the regular King’s Colonials shoulder titles.  This larger pattern shoulder title could also have been produced and worn for ceremonial occasions and again is unlikely to be a copy.

Figures 323 and 324: Front and rear images of a pair of large King’s Colonials shoulder titles in white metal with one retaining its ‘original’ backing cloth (Patrick Birley collection).

Unofficial Officer's Shoulder Titles


Unofficial Officer's Shoulder Titles Unofficial Officer's Shoulder Titles
In my collection I have a pair of shoulder titles which are marked in red enamel/paint K.C. on a gilding metal base with contemporary loops and it has been suggested that these were unofficial Officer's shoulder titles.  To date no photographic evidence has been identified to support this.

Figure 324a-b:  A pair of unofficial Officer's shoulder titles which are marked in red enamel/paint K.C. on a gilding metal base with contemporary loops.

Full Dress and Undress Buttons


The King’s Colonials Full Dress and Service Dress, tunic breast and cuff buttons were in gilt for Officers (Figure 325) and brass for Other Ranks (Figures 326 and 327) and are referenced as Ripley Ref No 419 for the cuff button and as Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 140 for the tunic button.  They are of the same design as the second pattern Regimental badge with the Prince of Wales’s plumes over ‘KC’ letters and Regimental motto “REGI ADSUMUS COLONI”.  The King’s Colonials button shown in Figure 325 is a 17mm diameter Officer's gilt tunic cuff button with Hobson of London maker’s mark on the sealed back.  An Other Rank's brass tunic breast button is shown in Figures 326 and 327 was made by Firmin & Son London and measures 24mm in diameter.  Buttons with a plain, sealed back have also been noted for the King’s Colonials.

The King’s Colonials buttons were worn 1901-10 and are referenced by Ripley and Darmanin as Ref No 140 under King Edward’s Horse. The authors note that there are also white metal King’s Colonials tunic buttons and this would be consistent with the white metal King’s Colonials shoulder titles noted in Figures  and , manufactured and worn on a ceremonial occasion/s.  A further note from the authors describes a domed button with silver Regimental device on gilt which may have been for an Officer’s cap or Mess Dress.

Figure 325: King’s Colonials Officer's gilt tunic cuff button (Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 140) (Ian Baker collection).
 
Figures 326 and 327: King’s Colonials Other Ranks' brass tunic button (Ripley 419). 

Mess Dress Lapel Badges and Buttons


Mess Dress Lapel Badges and Buttons Mess Dress Lapel Badges and Buttons
The King’s Colonials Officer’s Mess kit was a dark blue jacket with rolled, ribbed collar of scarlet silk which bore small gilt badges.  These Mess Dress badges were intertwined ‘KC’ letters of the same design used for the first pattern Regimental Collar badges, surmounted by the Prince of Wales’s plumes but lacking the Regimental motto.  An example of this badge is shown in Figure 328.  This gilt badge is flat backed with an indent behind the centre of the plume and with loops positioned north-south.  David Knight and Keith Hook (Journal of the Military Historical Society. 251:70-78, 2018) describe two different sizes of the mess dress lapel badges.

Unlike the Full Dress and Service Dress tunics, the Mess Dress cuffs were rounded with four rather than five, equal length stripes of ¾ inch scarlet cloth without buttons.
 
Figure 328:  Front and rear composite image of a King’s Colonials Mess Dress lapel badge (Laurie Osborne collection).

An Officer’s Mess Waiters tunic breast and cuff buttons have also been identified for the King’s Colonials and these are shown in Figures 329 and 330. Unlike tunic buttons, Mess Waiters buttons were not officially sanctioned and were chosen by the Officers of the Regiment.  The King’s Colonials Mess Waiters buttons bear the inter-twined letters ‘KC’ in script within the Garter strap surmounted by St Edward’s crown.  The tunic breast and cuff buttons are gilt, convex in shape and measure 27 and 17mm in diameter, respectively.  They are open backed with a back mark of Firmin London for the larger tunic breast button and the smaller cuff button is unmarked.    
       
 Figures 329 and 330: King’s Colonials Mess Dress tunic breast and cuff buttons in gilt (Ian Baker collection).

Sweetheart Badges - Regimental


King’s Colonials sweetheart badges are commonly brooched versions of their collar badges.   The first example of these is shown in Figures 331 and 332 which is a brooched (north-south) version of a die-struck, second pattern Regimental collar badge (as per Figure 203).
 
Figures 331 and 332:  Brooched version of a die-struck, second pattern Regimental collar badge worn as a Regimental sweetheart badge. 

Another type of sweetheart badge is in the form of a cravat pin (Figure 333) similarly fashioned from a flat-backed, die-cast, Officer’s second pattern Regimental collar badge (Figure 201).  This is the second of these cravat pins that I have seen and this may not be surprising as cravat pins were popular items of an Edwardian gentleman’s attire.

Figure 333: A King’s Colonial cravat pin fashioned from a flat-backed, die-cast, Officer’s second pattern Regimental collar badge. 



Sweetheart Badges - SQUadron


Sweetheart Badges - SQUadron Sweetheart Badges - SQUadron
Figures 334 and 335:  Brooched version of a die-struck ‘A’ Squadron (British Asian) collar badge worn as a Regimental sweetheart badge. 

Regimental Badge Devices on Swords


The sword of Major John Howard who commanded ‘B’ Squadron (Canadian) of the King’s Colonials and later King Edward’s Horse (1902-1913) is shown in Figures 335a-c.   Major Howard was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia on 17th June 1856 and died in March 1929 in London.  He was an original Officer in the King’s Colonials having joined in 1902 after service with the Canadian 66th Regiment.  Major Howard reverted to the rank of Captain in 1913 and did not see service in the Great War.  He went on to become Agent General of Nova Scotia in 1892.

The sword bears the Regimental device in the style of the second pattern Regimental headdress badge (KK 1371).  It was made by John Chalk and Dawson of London and bears Major Howard’s initials JH.    

Figure  335a: Upper section of the sword blade of Major John Howard of ‘B’ Squadron (Canadian) of the King’s Colonials and later King Edward’s Horse (1902-1913) (Peter Nemaric collection).

Figure 335b King’s Colonials regimental motifs on the blade of Major Howard's sword (Peter Nemaric collection).  

Figure 335c:  Major John Howard who commanded ‘B’ Squadron (Canadian) of the King’s Colonials, 1902-13.

First Pattern Officer's Headdress Badge


There are two patterns of the King Edward’s Horse headdress badge which differ in the style of the crown.

The first and second pattern headdress badges worn by the Officers and Other Ranks of the King Edward’s Horse are large badges which depict a shield of the Royal Standard to the centre of a wreath of oak and laurel that bears the names of the Commonwealth countries involved, surmounted by the Royal Crest.  The first pattern headdress badge is surmounted with a distinctive ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown not found on any other headdress badge worn by the British army.  The crown on the second pattern headdress badge is a regular Imperial crown synonymous with the period 1902-1953 and generally referred to as the King's crown.  Beneath the Crown there is a scroll bearing the title and to the lower edge the motto and tablet "KODR" for the King’s Overseas Dominion Regiment (KK 1506).  

The first pattern headdress badges were worn from the re-naming of the Regiment to King Edward's Horse in 1910 until at least 1916 and can be seen being worn in Figure 336 with the badge in close-up in Figures 337-338.    

Figure 336:  The ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown (KK 1506) first pattern King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks headdress badge in gilding metal with tunic button worn by Private Jim Kerr (Regimental number 379) circa 1914 (Peter Nemaric collection).

The first pattern headdress badge in Figures 337-338 is an Officer’s version of KK 1506 which is die-cast, voided bronze fitted with east-west blades.  
 
Figures 337-338:  A genuine First Pattern King Edward’s Horse Officer’s headdress badge in die cast bronze with a ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown (KK 1506) with east-west blades (now folded back on themselves) circa 1910-16. 

First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge


First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge
The first pattern Other Ranks headdress badges (KK 1506) shown in Figures 339-340 and 341-342 are both die-struck and voided with one fitted with east-west loops and the other north-south loops.  The sizes of the Officers' bronze and Other Ranks gilding metal headdress badges are the same. All three of the first pattern badges shown are genuine.

To date I have not come across a version of the first pattern, Saxon Crown headdress badge (KK 1506) with a slider fitting.  A version of this badge is noted in the collection of W. Y. Carman (labelled as badge 14 in Figure 110) as having been made by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company of London.

Figures 339-340:  Front and rear of a genuine first pattern King Edward’s Horse Other Rank’s headdress badge in gilding metal with a ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown (KK 1506) with east-west loops circa 1910-16. 

Additional First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge


Additional First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge Additional First Pattern Other Ranks' Headdress Badge
Figures 341-342:  Front and rear of a genuine first pattern King Edward’s Horse Other Rank’s headdress badge in gilding metal with a ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown (KK 1506) and fitted with north-south loops circa 1910-16. 

Second Pattern Headdress Badge


Second Pattern Headdress Badge Second Pattern Headdress Badge
A later version of the King Edward’s Horse headdress badge known as the second pattern has a rounded King’s Crown (KK 1507). The War Office sealed the second pattern King Edward’s Horse headdress badge as Pattern Number 8676/1916 in gilding metal on the 22/2/1916 .  This badge is shown being worn in Figure 343 and in close-up in Figure 344. and was worn 1916-24.

Figure 343:  Portrait photograph of Trooper J. Steer-Bowker showing the second pattern King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks headdress badge (KK 1507) © Imperial War Museum (HU 118517).

The badge shown in Figure 344 is an Officers version, die-cast in bronze with east-west blades and was worn as part of Officers Service Dress.   Bronzed versions of the die-struck gilding metal version of the headdress badge fitted with a slider are also known where a bronze finish has been applied to the front of the badge only.
 
Figure 344:  Front and rear views of a genuine second pattern King Edward’s Horse Officer’s headdress badge in bronze with a rounded King’s Crown (KK 1507) and east-west blades circa 1916-24. 

Additional Second Pattern Headdress Badge


Additional Second Pattern Headdress Badge Additional Second Pattern Headdress Badge
The badge shown in Figures 345-346 is a second pattern King Edward's Horse Other Ranks' headdress badge in die-struck, gilding metal and fitted with a slider.  This slider is crimped from the original manufacture process and together with the voiding on the badge and the quality of the strike these features constitute a genuine badge.  

Figures 345-346:  A genuine second pattern King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks’ headdress badge in gilding metal with a rounded King’s Crown (KK 1507) and crimped slider with correct Audsumus spelling circa 1916-24.  

Variant Second Pattern Headdress Badges


There are variants of the King Edward's Horse headdress badges which bear the spelling of the Latin word Adsumus (translated to English as 'Here we are') as Ausumus as shown in Figures 347-348.
 
Figures 347-348: A genuine King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks’ headdress badge in gilding metal with a rounded King’s Crown (KK 1508) and crimped slider with variant Ausumus spelling circa 1916-24.  

Examination of the group photograph of King Edward’s Horse Officers shown in Figure 349 shows that both bronze and gilding metal headdress badges (KK 1507 likely) were worn.

Figure 349:  A group of King Edward’s Horse Officers at camp near Salisbury Plain in 1914 (Peter Nemaric collection).

An Other Ranks gilding metal version of KK 1508 with a slider that has had its front surface painted bronze has been brought to my attention and this is likely to be a field conversion for an Other Rank commissioned in the field.

King Edward's Horse - Copy Headdress Badges


King Edward's Horse - Copy Headdress Badges King Edward's Horse - Copy Headdress Badges
The King Edward’s Horse second pattern headdress badge has been extensively copied.  Copies were first noted by Laurence Archer in the 1970's and are referenced by Kipling and King.  Thankfully the copies are relatively easy to distinguish from an original badge.  The most commonly encountered copy is a die-struck badge in white metal with a slider or loops as shown in Figures 350-351.
 
Figures 350-351: A copy of a King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks’ headdress badge in die-struck white metal with a rounded King’s Crown (KK 1508), variant Ausumus spelling and east-west lugs.  

The Australian War Memorial has a copy of the King Edward’s Horse headdress badge (KK 1507) which is in die-struck, white metal with a slider marked JR Gaunt and Sons.  Frederick Wilkinson in his book 'Cavalry and Yeomanry Badges of the British Army 1914' (Arms and Armour Press, London, 1973) shows both a gilding metal (Ref No 2350 and white metal version (Ref No 236) with the white metal version being a copy.

Other copies of this badge can be found in die-struck, gilding metal and either lacking the voids around the central shield and within the Crown.  On some gilding metal copies the voids in and around the crown look as if they have been drilled as they are circular holes rather than the irregular shaped voids on original badges.  

Officer's Round Pattern Headdress Badge


Officers of the King Edward’s Horse also wore an alternate smaller, circular bronzed headdress badge (KK 1509) with a KEH monogram to the centre of a circular Regimental motto surmounted by the King’s Crown.  This badge can be seen in the portrait photograph of Lieutenant Colonel Lionel Jones DSO in Figure 352.

Figure 352:  Lieutenant Lionel Jones DSO wearing round pattern King Edward’s Horse (KK 1509) Officers' headdress badge with first or second pattern collar badges (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921).

The round pattern headdress badges are die-cast and bronzed with blades (Figures 353-354).  This example bears the maker’s mark of ‘J & Co’ for Jennens & Co to the rear.

Figures 353-354:  King Edward’s Horse round pattern Officer’s bronze headdress badge marked J&Co (KK 1509).  

First and Second Pattern Collar Badges being worn


First and Second Pattern Collar Badges being worn First and Second Pattern Collar Badges being worn
The large King Edward’s Horse headdress badges with first pattern Saxon Crown (KK 1506) or second pattern King’s Crown (Kipling and King 1507) were worn with matching pairs of collar badges of the same pattern as the headdress badge.  The collar badges with Saxon Crown as per the style of the voided headdress badge (KK 1506) are referenced as Churchill and Westlake Ref No 116 in yellow brass.  The difference in the style of the Crown is difficult to make out in contemporary photographs but it is reasonable to assume that in early photographs of King Edward’s Horse dating 1910-1914 that the Saxon Crown collars are being worn and in post -1914 photographs the King’s Crown pattern is being worn.  However, just to confuse matters it is reasonable to assume that if the individual received first pattern collar badges he is quite likely to still be wearing them in post-1914 photographs.  The first and second pattern headdress and collar badges are shown being worn in Figures 355 and 356, respectively.

Figure 355:  Portrait photograph of Lieutentant Colonel C. Harding KCMG, King Edward's Horse showing the non-voided collar badge ©Imperial War Museum (HU 120500).

Figure 356: Lieutentant A. J. Mackintosh showing the voided King Edward’s Horse collar badges (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 116) ©Imperial War Museum (HU 117631).

The collar badges shown in Figure 356 are voided gilding metal with north-south loops. This pattern of collar badge can be found voided or non-voided and with copper loops in either a north-south or east-west position. It should be noted that both voided and non-voided collar badges are genuine.

First Pattern Officer's Collar Badges


First Pattern Officer's Collar Badges First Pattern Officer's Collar Badges
The first pattern Saxon Crown collar badges shown in Figures 355a-356a are voided, die-cast bronze with east-west copper loops. This pattern of collar badge can be found voided or non-voided and were worn by Officers as Officers Service Dress (OSD).

Figure 355a-356a:  Pair of genuine first pattern Saxon Crown King Edward's Horse OSD collar badges (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 116) in voided bronze with east-west loops. 


First Pattern Other Ranks' Collar Badges


The first pattern Saxon Crown collar badges shown in Figures 357-358 are voided, die-struck gilding metal with north-south loops. This pattern of collar badge can be found voided or non-voided and with copper loops in either a north-south or east-west position and were worn by Other Ranks.

Figure 357-358:  Pair of genuine first pattern Saxon Crown King Edward's Horse Other Ranks' collar badges (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 116) in voided gilding metal with north-south loops. 

Figure 358a:  Pair of genuine first pattern Saxon Crown King Edward's Horse Other Ranks' collar badge (Churchill and Westlake Ref No 116) in non-voided gilding metal with north-south loops. 

Other Ranks of the King Edward's Horse wore either yellow-brass or gilding metal first or second pattern collar badges.

Round Pattern Officer's Collar Badges


Officers of the King Edward's Horse wore either first, second or round pattern collar badges in bronze, yellow-brass or gilding metal.

The round pattern Officers' headdress badges were worn with first or second pattern collar badges as shown in Figure 359 with the badges shown in Figures 360-361 or with slightly smaller matching collars as can be seen in Figure 362 and Figures 363-364 which follow.

Figure 359:  Major H. Swan of King Edward’s Horse wearing an Officer’s round pattern headdress badge (KK 1509) with a pair of second pattern collar badges in non-voided gilding metal ©Imperial War Museum (HU 118798). 
 
Figures 360-361:  Pair of original second pattern Saxon Crown collar badges in non-voided, die-cast gilding metal with north-south loops shown with the King Edward's Horse Officer’s round pattern headdress badge in die-cast bronze with blades (KK 1509) (Garry White collection). 


Round Pattern Officer's Headdress and Collar Badges


Figure 362:  Major Richard Ernest Noel Twopeny MC and bar, an Australian serving with King Edward’s Horse circa 1916 and wearing round type Officers bronze headdress (KK 1509) and matching collar badges. Major Twopeny was born in 1893 in South Australia, commissioned into the King Edward’s Horse on 25th May 1915 as a 2nd Lieutenant and returned to Australia on 13th April 1920 (Peter Nemaric collection).

Figures 363-364:  Front and rear images of King Edward’s Horse round type Officer’s headdress badge (KK 1509) in bronze with blades (makers marked J&Co for Jennens & Co) together with a matching pair of bronze collar badges with loops, worn 1916-1919. 

Wearing Collar Badges


Wearing Collar Badges Wearing Collar Badges
There is evidence from the diaries of King Edward’s Horse members that at least some of the Regiment continued to wear their old King’s Colonials Squadron headdress and collar badges through into the Great War.  Lieutenant Allan Wettenhall Lade writes in aletter to his mother on the 13th December 1914, ‘I have just bought one of my own a very smart affair riding breeches and now have collar badges of Australian birth…the Kangaroo.  Every man in our troop has the distinctive badge of his Colony – India an Elephant, Africa an Ostrich, Canada a beaver and so on.’ Corporal Brian (Frederick) Wade, King Edward’s Horse writes: ‘For some time I have been trying to obtain a cap-badge to complete the set, and tonight I am posting to you a set of three; cap, collar and shoulder badges (Brian Wade. Peace, War & Afterwards (1914-1919). Halifax: Sentinel Projects, 1996).  The largest is worn on the front of the cap, the smallest on the collar-lapel, and the numerals on the shoulder- badge mean “King Edward’s Horse = “Kings Overseas Dominions Regiment”.  The collar badges are, I think, the most interesting, the ostrich with a background of ‘koppies’ and mountains backed by the sun which is so typically South Africa.’  

The photograph in Figure 365 of Trooper Godfrey John Buckland, King Edward’s Horse shows the ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) kangaroo collar badges being worn with a King Edward’s Horse headdress badge.  The ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges are also shown on the King Edward’s Horse tunic in Figure 96.  The original King’s Colonials Squadron collar badges were still favoured by some members of King Edward’s Horse up until at least 1915.  

Figure 365:  Photograph of Private Godfrey John Buckland (Regimental number 583) of King Edward’s Horse in Service Dress uniform circa 1914 with 1903-pattern, Mounted Infantry leather 50 round .303 bandolier and King Edward’s Horse Regimental headdress badge and ‘C’ Squadron (Australian) collar badges.  Private Buckland was born in Charters Towers in Queensland on the 30th January 1893 and enlisted on 26th August 1914 in England.  He was killed by a German rifle grenade on 7th August 1915 after seeing action at Ploegsteert Wood in July 1915 (Peter Nemaric collection).

Collar badges were generally not worn by Other Ranks of the King Edward’s Horse from 1915 onwards (Figure 366).

Figure 366:  Sergeant Tiplady (seated centre of the second row) and his Troop of ‘A’ Squadron of King Edward’s Horse at Canterbury in August 1914 without collar badges (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Comrades Association Annual Bulletin. Number 20: 13, 1953). 

Officers' Pouch Belt, Pouch and Horse Furniture Badges


The Officer of the King Edward’s Horse shown in Figure 367 is wearing a pouch belt with a Regimental pouch belt badge (in the style of KK 1506) between the lion’s head holder with three chains and a whistle.
 
Figure 367:  The mounted party of King Edward’s Horse riding through St. Leonards Terrace, Chelsea prior to taking their part in the procession on Royal Parade Day 23rd June 1911.  The Officer on the far left is wearing a pouch belt and pouch belt badge (R. J. Smith and R. G. Harris. The Yeomanry Force at the 1911 Coronation (The Uniforms of the British Yeomanry Force 1794-1914. Picton Publishing, Chippenham, 1988).  
 

The Officer’s pouch belt badge was finished in gilt and was attached using three screw posts.  The Officer’s pouch itself bore a distinctive King Edward’s Horse Officer’s pouch badge in fire gilt with inter-twined letters KEH within a laurel wreath surmounted by a King’s Crown and with three fixing bolts to the rear as shown in Figure 368.
 
Figure 368:  A King Edward’s Horse Officer’s pouch badge in fire gilt with three screw posts circa 1910-1924. 

The mounts of the King Edward’s Horse wore ear boss badges that were white metal, circular discs mounted with a gilding metal Officer’s badge as shown in Figure 369.  These are of the same design as the Officer’s pouch badge.  The badge was attached to the metal disc with three wire prongs which protruded through three small holes in the backing disc.
 
Figure 369: A King Edward’s Horse fire gilt Officer’s pouch badge circa 1910-1924 (Peter Taylor collection). 

NCOs' Arm Badges


NCOs' Arm Badges
The senior NCOs of the King Edward's Horse continued the practice of the senior NCOs of the King's Colonials in wearing the Regimental badge also as an arm badge above their rank chevrons.  

Figure 370 is an image of the King Edward’s Horse tunic (originally shown in Figure 96) of Sergeant with an arm badge about the rank chevrons and below the trade badge (harness maker on this tunic) of the right sleeve.  The arm badge is in the same style as the ‘spikey’ Saxon Crown headdress badge (KK 1506) (Figures 337-338) and it would follow that arm badges may also be found of the pattern of the later King’s Crown headdress badge (KK 1507).  It is likely that the senior NCO arm badges would have had loops for attaching through the tunic rather than a slider for wearing in the cap.

Figure 370:  Close-up photograph of the right shoulder of the Undress uniform tunic of a Sergeant of the King Edward’s Horse (from Figure 96) circa 1914.  A khaki trade proficiency badge for a harness maker is worn uppermost on the right sleeve above the gilding metal King Edward’s Horse Regimental badge (KK 1506) and above the gold on khaki backing cloth rank chevrons (Peter Nemaric collection).

Shoulder Titles being Worn


Officers and Other Ranks of the King Edward’s Horse wore a distinctive gilding metal two-tier shoulder title bearing KEH over KODR for King Edward’s Horse - King’s Own Dominion Regiment (Westlake Ref No 204). The shoulder titles were worn on the Full and Undress tunics on the shoulder chains (Figure 371) or directly on the Service Dress tunic (Figure 372-373).

Figure 371:  A shoulder title of the King Edward’s Horse in gilding metal on shoulder chains of the Undress tunic (Figure 96) circa 1914 (Peter Nemaric collection). 

Figures 372-373:  A King Edward's Horse shoulder title being worn on the Service Dress tunic.  The Trooper is wearing the 1903 Leather Equipment with the bandolier having 9-pockets, 5 on the front, with an additional 4 on the rear (Pierre Vandervelden collection).



Shoulder Titles


The Sealed Pattern card for the King Edward's Horse shoulder title is held by the Imperial War Museum.  

Figures 372a-373a show the front and rear of a pair of the King Edward's Horse shoulder titles in gilding metal with copper loops.

Figures 372a-373a:  A pair of shoulder titles of the King Edward’s Horse in gilding metal with copper loops circa 1910-1924.

Maker marked shoulder titles for King Edward’s Horse have not been encountered.

The shoulder titles were worn with a brass backing plate on the Service Dress uniform when shoulder scales were not being worn (Figure 374a).

Figure 374a:  A pair of shoulder titles of the King Edward’s Horse in gilding metal with brass backing plates circa 1910-1924.

A cloth slip-on shoulder strap title with a straight K.E.H. over a semi-circular K.O.D.R. embroidered in white on khaki background was approved by the Army Clothing Department on 13/9/1916 as Pattern No. 9114/1916 with the Sealed Pattern card held by the Imperial War Museum.  There is no photographic proof to show that this cloth shoulder title was ever issued or worn.  The existence of a Sealed Pattern card for a cloth shoulder title for the Essex Yeomanry is also noted as never having been issued and worn (Michael Wood, personal communication).
 




Buttons


The tunic large-sized breast (25mm) and medium-sized cuff (19mm) buttons and small cap (17mm) button of King Edward’s Horse depict a King’s Crown surmounting the letters KEH.

Figure 374:  A King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks Full Dress brass tunic breast and brass cuff buttons (Ripley Ref No 420) and Officer's gilt cap button all marked Hobson & Son, London. 

The cuff button is referenced as Ripley Ref No 420 as King Edward’s Horse (The King’s Overseas Dominion Regiment) 1910-24 with a similar depiction in Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 141 who note gilt for Officers and brass for Other Ranks.

The buttons shown in Figures 374-375 and 376 have sealed backs with either fixed or floating shanks (see Figure 376). The button back marks for King Edward's Horse identified to date are Hobson & Son, London and Jennens & Co, London. Some King Edward's Horse buttons are noted as being unmarked.

Figure 375-6:  Two pairs of King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks Full Dress brass tunic breast buttons marked Hobson & Son, London and Jennens & Co, London. 


Other Makers Marked Buttons


Other Makers Marked Buttons Other Makers Marked Buttons
There are King Edward’s Horse buttons which bear Jennens & Co London as a makers mark and some which bear no maker’s mark.

Figure 377:  A King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks Full Dress tunic breast button (Ripley Ref No 420) button in brass marked Jennens & Co London.  

Sweetheart Badges


Several different examples of King Edward’s Horse sweetheart badges have been noted.  The most commonly encountered are enameled versions of a scaled down headdress badge with brooch fittings as per the example in Figures 378-379.  

Figures 378-379:  The front and rear of a King Edward’s Horse enamel sweetheart badge with brooch fitting. 

Another sweetheart badge with this version a sterling silver miniature King Edward’s Horse headdress badge mounted on a sword as shown in Figure 380.
 
Figure 380:  A sterling silver King Edward’s Horse enamel sweetheart badge fitted to a sword with brooch fitting made by Atkin Bros in Sheffield. 
 

Additional Sweetheart Badges and Ephemera


Additional Sweetheart Badges and Ephemera Additional Sweetheart Badges and Ephemera
A simpler version of a sweetheart badge is shown in Figure 381 which is a King Edward’s Horse brass button made by Hobson and Son of London which has had the shank removed and a brooch fitting attached for it to be worn as a sweetheart badge.
 
Figure 381:  A King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks Full Dress tunic button in brass converted with a brooch fitting to a sweetheart badge. 

There were also sweetheart badges for the King Edward's Horse which were worn as tie pins.  

The headdress badge of the King Edward’s Horse was also featured in a stylised form on a silk cigarette card from 1913 as shown in Figure 382.

Figure 382:  A silk cigarette card depicting the stylised badge of King Edward’s Horse circa 1913. 

Headdress Badges - Sealed Pattern and Officers


The 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badge (KK 1134) was sealed as Pattern Number 8598/1915 and approved on the 172/12/1915 in gilding metal for Other Ranks and is shown being worn in Figure 383.  

Figure 383:  Trooper J. A. Moss in an Other Ranks Service Dress uniform of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse circa 1915-1917 ©Imperial War Museum (HU 124478).

The 2nd King Edward's Horse headdress badge was slightly larger than the first and second pattern (1st) King Edward’s Horse headdress badges (KK 1506 and 1507), respectively with a King’s Crown and bearing additional scrolls ‘Crown Colonies’, ‘1914’ and ‘Empire and Liberty’.

The headdress badge was die-cast in bronze for Officers and die-struck in gilding metal for Other Ranks.  An example of the Officers' headdress badge is shown in Figure 384-385.  This bronzed badge was worn with Officers Service Dress and is fitted with blades.

Figures 384-385:  An original Officer’s headdress badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in bronze with east-west blades circa 1915-1917.  

Additional Officer's Headdress Badge


Additional Officer's Headdress Badge Additional Officer's Headdress Badge
The 2nd King Edward's Horse Officers' headdress badge (KK 1134) shown in Figure 386-387 is also in die-cast bronze but this example is fitted with east-west loops.

Figures 386-387:  An original Officer’s headdress badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in bronze with copper loops circa 1915-1917. 

Other Ranks' Headdress Badges


Other Ranks' Headdress Badges Other Ranks' Headdress Badges
The Other Ranks version of the 2nd King Edward's Horse headdress badge (KK 1134) is die-struck in gilding metal with a slider.  The slider is crimped from the original manufacturing process and is attached behind the base of the King's Crown.  An example of this badge is shown in Figures 388-389.  

Figures 388-389:  An original Other Ranks headdress badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in gilding metal with a crimped slider circa 1915-1917. 

Headdress Badge Copies


Headdress Badge Copies Headdress Badge Copies
Copies of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badge can be found in gilding metal with a J.R GAUNT LONDON makers mark on the slider which lack a crimp mark.  There are also copies in white metal with both sliders and loops (John Gaylor. Military Badge Collecting, Sixth Edition. London: LeoCooper, 1996).   The most commonly encountered copies of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badge are readily identified by the fact that they are non-voided.  

A smaller non-voided gilding metal Other Ranks version is noted by Reginald H. Cox (Military Badges of the British Empire 1914-18. London: Ernest Benn Limited, 1982).  An example of this is shown in Figures 389-391 with the non-voided badge being die struck in gilding metal with a slider.  This badge is a copy.  The 2nd King Edward’s Horse did not wear side caps or other forms of headdress apart from the peaked cap and so pagri badges and the like were not worn apart from the regular size voided headdress badge.
 
Figures 389-391: A non-voided, small copy of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse headdress badge with a modern, non-crimped slider of an incorrect shape.  

Voided Officer's Collar Badges


Officers and Other Ranks of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse wore pairs of collar badges in patterns matching the headdress badge as shown being worn in Figure 392.  

Figure 392:  Officer’s voided headdress badge and non-voided collar badges of Lieutenant Colonel Montagu Cradock CB CMG, 2nd King Edward’s Horse in gilding metal circa 1917.  Lieutenant Colonel Cradock was born in Giling East, North Yorkshire on the 16th October 1859 and died in London on the 14th December 1929 Having first enlisted in the Durham Fusiliers in 1877, as a Second Lieutenant he saw active service in Afghanistan in 1879-1880 with the 6th Dragoon Guards.   Having retired from the army as a Captain in the 6th Dragoon Guards he emigrated to New Zealand in 1893.  In 1900, Major Cradock took command of the 2nd New Zealand Contingent in the Second Boer War.  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and commanded the 3rd Mounted Infantry Corps and Bushmen’s Brigade.  During the Great War he commanded the 2nd King Edward’s Horse ©Imperial War Museum (HU 120500).
 

The 2nd King Edward's Horse collar badges were in bronze for Officers (Figures 393-394) and in gilding metal for Other Ranks (Figure 395-396).  Voided and non-voided genuine examples are known for both.

Figures 393-394:  A pair of Officer’s voided collar badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in die cast bronze with hexagonal loops circa 1915-1917 (With permission The Irish Grenadier).

Non-Voided Officer's Collar Badges


Figures 395-396:  An Officer’s non-voided collar badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in die-cast bronze with rounded east-west loops circa 1915-1917. 

Although photographic evidence of the Other Ranks of the 2nd King Edward's Horse wearing collar badges is yet to be identified, the collar badge depicted in Figures 397-398 is gilding metal and is die struck consistent with it being an Other Ranks collar badge.

Figures 397-398:  Other Ranks non-voided collar badge of 2nd King Edward’s Horse in die-struck gilding metal with north-south copper loops circa 1915-1917 (Alex Rice collection).

Other Rank's Shoulder Titles


The 2nd King Edward’s Horse Officers and Other Ranks wore a distinctive gilding metal shoulder title of 2 over KEH (Westlake Ref No 205) which is shown being worn on the Service Dress tunic in Figure 399, on a shoulder chain in Figure 401, with a pair of shoulder titles being shown in Figure 400.  

Figure 399: An unknown Trooper of 2nd King Edward’s Horse wearing a voided headdress badge and 2KEH shoulder titles (Westlake Ref No 205) on his shoulder chains circa 1915-17.  

Figure 400: A pair of 2nd KEH shoulder titles (Westlake Ref No 205) with rounded loops circa 1915-17.  


Figure 401: A 2nd KEH shoulder title (Westlake Ref No 205) shown on a shoulder chain  

Additional Other Ranks Shoulder Titles


Additional Other Ranks Shoulder Titles Additional Other Ranks Shoulder Titles
The 2nd King Edward’s Horse Officers and Other Ranks shoulder titles were also made with hexagonal loops as shown in Figure 402.  

Figure 402: The rear of a 2nd KEH shoulder title (Westlake Ref No 205) with hexagonal loops circa 1915-17. 

A size variant has also been identified being smaller than the standard 2KEH shoulder title.  This title was theatre-adapted from a King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominion Regiment) KEH/KODR which has had the KODR part removed and a crudely cut 2 brazed on above the KEH piece.  The wearer is known to have transferred between King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse hence the shoulder title modification. 

Figure 403: A theatre-adapted 2KEH shoulder title (left) compared with a standard 2KEH shoulder title.  

A slip-on shoulder strap title with 2 over KEH embroidered in white on a trapezoid shaped olive-green cloth patch (Imperial War Museum Catalogue Number INS 31138) was approved by the Army Clothing Department on 22/6/1917 as Pattern No. 9552/1917 with the Sealed Pattern card held by the Imperial War Museum. This Pattern was over-stamped obsolete on the 7/10/1919 and there is no photographic evidence supporting it ever having been issued and worn.  The existence of a Sealed Pattern card for a cloth shoulder title for the Essex Yeomanry is also noted as never having been issued and worn (Michael Wood, personal communication).

Officer's Shoulder Title


Officer's Shoulder Title Officer's Shoulder Title
There is also a variant King Edward’s Horse Officer’s shoulder title which is straight pattern 2nd KEH in a gilt finish (Figures 404-405).

Figures 404-405: A variant 2nd KEH shoulder title that is a single line of 2nd KEH rather than 2 over KEH in gilding metal with rounded loops circa 1915-17 (Patrick Birley collection). 

Buttons


Buttons Buttons
The 2nd King Edward's Horse buttons were in gilt for Officers and brass for Other Ranks (Figures 405a) with a simple design of 2 over KEH (Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 142).  Ripley and Darmanin only note a brass button and do not differentiate between Officers and Other Ranks.  The buttons are in two sizes, 25mm for the breast of the tunic and 17mm for the cuff.

Figure 405a: A pair of 2nd King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks brass tunic buttons (Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 142). 

Figure 406: The rear of a 2nd King Edward’s Horse Other Ranks brass tunic button (Ripley and Darmanin Ref No 142) maker marked Armfield & Co Ltd Birmingham. 

Sweetheart Badges


Sweetheart Badges Sweetheart Badges
Several different examples of the 2nd King Edward’s Horse sweetheart badges have been noted.  There are both enameled and brooched-collar badge versions in gilding metal versions as per the examples in Figures 407 and 408, respectively.   The brooched-collar badge example in Figure 408 is shown as badge No 16 on plate XVII on page 36 of Pamela M. Caunt's 'Military Sweetheart Jewelry Part II" Arbras, London,  1988.  

Figure 407:  A 2nd King Edward’s Horse enamel sweetheart badge with brooch fitting.

Figure 408:  A 2nd King Edward’s Horse gilding metal collar badge adapted as a sweetheart badge with the addition of a brooch fitting. 

Old Comrades Reunions


The King Edward’s Horse Old Comrades Association commenced holding an annual reunion in 1919 and these continued until the last in 1972.

 A King Edward’s Horse Old Comrades (Senior and Junior) Annual Bulletin was first produced in 1933.  The Annual Bulletin contained a member’s contact list and ran until Bulletin 39 in 1972.

The first Reunion dinner of the King Edward’s Horse was held on the 1st August 1919 at the Holborn Restaurant in London and the menu card is signed by several of the attendees including Colonel Lionel James CB DSO and Major Sir Ralph D. Furse KCMG DSO and Bar.

Figure 409:  A menu card from the first reunion dinner of the King Edward’s Horse held on the 1st August 1919 at the Holborn Restaurant in London (Darren O'Brien collection).

Figure 410:  A dinner ticket from the first reunion dinner of the King Edward’s Horse held on the 1st August 1919 at the Holborn Restaurant in London named to J.C. Eastich (Darren O'Brien collection).

Figure 411:  A ticket for a reunion lunch at the Shaftesbury Hotel in London in 1953 attended by Squadron Quarter Master Sergeant MacIntosh.  

Additional Reunions


Additional Reunions Additional Reunions
Figure 412: The reunion lunch of the King Edward’s Horse held in 1919 (R. J. Smith collection).  
 
Figure 413: The reunion lunch of the King Edward’s Horse held in 1953 with still a considerable number of attendees (The King Edward’s Horse Senior and Junior Old Comrades Association Bulletin. Number 20: 4, 1953).   

Museum Collections


Museum Collections
Displays of King’s Colonials and King Edwards Horse uniforms, badges and mementos were originally on display at the National Army Museum which opened in Sandhurst in 1960.   Among the items on display was a King Edward’s Horse Sergeant’s tunic and a King Edward’s Horse Recruiting Poster. Noted as being in storage was an Officer’s Mess Dress uniform, sundry items of uniform and a case of Regimental badges mainly of the King’s Colonials period that had been presented in memory of F. G. Corbett.

In 1960, the Imperial War Museum in London had on display a King's Colonials headdress badge, shoulder titles and two buttons in its Badge Room.

Today there is no permanent display of King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and 2nd King Edward’s Horse uniforms or badges at either the National Army Museum or at the Imperial War Museum.  The collections of both museums list and detail a number of King’s Colonials, King Edward’s Horse and 2nd King Edward’s Horse items but the images are not available on-line.  The majority of these items are photographs, uniforms, badges and some correspondence.  I have tabulated these items below:

ItemObject TypeAccession Number 
Slouch hat, three badges and plume, King's Colonial Yeomanry, worn by King George V, 1911 (c).Uniforms1963-05-3
Cap badge and collar badge, Imperial Legion, 4th County of London (King's Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry, 1905 (c).Badges1985-06-68
Five uniform and equipment items, King's Colonial Yeomanry, worn by HM King George V, 1901-1911.Uniforms1963-05-24



Slouch hat, King's Colonials, nd.Uniforms1964-01-5
Badge and uniform items, King's Colonials, 1902 (c).Badges1958-07-80
Badge and uniform items, King's Colonials, 1902 (c).Uniforms1958-07-80
12 picture postcards (5 with messages written on them) and 6 small photographs depicting King Edward's Horse on summer manoeuvres at Salisbury (1913) and Canterbury (1914); the postcards were sent by V V Pedlar (1892-1979).Photographs1997-01-54
Box spurs, 1914; belonging to the uniform of Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant P E McEnvoy, King Edwards Horse.Horse Furniture1991-08-226
Ammunition pouch, 1914; belonging to the uniform of Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant P E McEnvoy, King Edwards Horse.Equipment, general1991-08-227
Copy photograph of a Trooper of King Edward's Horse, taken from an original photograph in the FJS Military Series, 1906 (c); copy photograph of a Church Parade of 202 Infantry Brigade (?) and featuring men of The Buffs, Canterbury, taken from an original photograph by aTonbridge photographer, 1914-1915.Photographs1992-05-51
Collection of 79 photographs relating to King Edward's Horse, 1902 (c)-1968; subjects include portraits, groups, reunion, parades, a funeral, a Coronation, camp and kit inspection.Photographs1989-09-60
28 postcard photographs collected by P E McEnvoy, King Edward's Horse, 1911-1916.Photographs1990-10-48
Cap badge, other ranks' and shoulder title, other ranks', worn by Robert Bruce Campbell, 2nd King Edward's Horse, 1915 (c); Campbell was commissioned to 2/Lt Labour Corps, 1918.Badges1991-03-125
Medal group awarded to Private Albert Thomas Pennifold, 11th Lancashire Fusiliers, also previously attached to 1st Bn Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 6th Bn Dragoon Guards, 3rd Bn Dragoon Guards and King Edward's Horse.Medals2002-10-1
Medal group awarded to Private Ronald Lashley Bynoe, King Edward's Horse, 1914 (c)-1918 (c): 1914-15 Star; British War Medal 1914-20; Allied Victory Medal 1914-1919; associated with World War One (1914-1918).Medals2003-10-2
Small metal plate with screw fastening at the back, nd; inscribed, 'Presented By/ Lady Brake, MBE.,/ To The Memory Of Her Husband/ Sir Francis Brake, M.I.E.E, M.I.Prod. E., F.R.S.A.,/ Who Served With Distinction In/ King Edward's Horse/ In The 1914-18 War'; it is unknown where this plate came from and to what it was attached; associated with World War One (1914-1918).Equipment, general2003-12-43
Papers relating to King Edward's Horse: Regimental Orders, 15 Jul 1914; manuscript report of an address by Lt Gen R C B Hacking, XI Army Corps, concerning the importance of the regiment's action, 9 Apr 1918; two copies of a printed report to the regimental committee on the action of 9 Apr 1918; manuscript letters from Lt Col Lionel James to Denbigh, requesting and acknowledging receipt of further details of the action; letters drafted 6 and 13 Dec 1918; autographed menu, C Coy No 6 Officers' Cadet Bn, Worcester College Oxford, Dominion Day Dinner 1916; King Edward's Horse Association Bulletins - No 15 1948, No 32 1965, No 35 1968; ticket and application form for 50th Anniversary Luncheon and subscription form 1968; sketch and description of King Edward's Horse flag at Haileybury Imperial Service College; three page history of the unit from the MHS Bulletin; words and music of 'Land of Hope and Glory'.Archives1989-09-59
Papers, 1898-1918; associated with Robert Bruce Campbell, Assam Valley Light Horse, 2nd King Edward's Hope and Indian Labour Corps.Archives1991-03-151
Postcard photograph of Trooper C F Burr, King Edward's Horse, 1917 (c).Photographs1984-06-66
Flag of 1st King Edward's Horse The King's Oversea Dominions Regiment. Pencil with crayon, 1918; associated with World War One (1914-1918).Drawings and Watercolours1989-09-62
Photograph and autograph album of 1st King Edward's Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1914-1915; associated with World War One, Home Front and Western Front (1914-1918).Archives2004-09-230
Photograph and autograph album of 1st King Edward's Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1914-1915; associated with World War One, Home Front and Western Front (1914-1918).Photographs2004-09-230
Photograph album of 29 photographs relating to King Edward's Horse (Kings Overseas Dominions Regiment camp, 1905 (c). (Album dimensions: 17.75 x 24 x 2 cm).Photographs1989-09-58
Hotchkiss gun ammunition clip, nd; used at the Battle of Lys, 1918, during the Spring offensive when King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), held up large forces of Germans between 9th and 12th April 1918; associated with the Battle of Lys, World War One, Western Front (1914-1918) 1918.Ammunition1958-07-81
Twelve photographs associated with regimental silver of King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1904 (c)-1917; deposited at Hailybury College.Photographs1981-01-82
Shoulder title, King Edward's Horse (The King's Overseas Dominians Regiment), nd; standard pattern, sealed pattern, 1916.Badges1992-07-156
Three photographs associated with Leinster Regiment, King Edward's Horse and King's Own Royal Regiment, 1880 (c)-1918 (c).Photographs1982-09-52
Lapel badge, British Legion, associated with SQMS P E McEvoy, formally of King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1950 (c).Badges1992-03-67
Five buttons, associated with SQMS P E McEvoy, formally of King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1913 (c)-1918.Badges1992-03-68
Three shoulder titles, 2nd King Edward's Horse, 1916; sealed pattern, 1916.Badges1992-02-181
Two shoulder titles, King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1916; sealed pattern, 1916.Badges1992-02-180
Cap badge, all ranks', King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1916; sealed pattern, 1916.Badges1992-02-179
Five lapel badges associated with SQMS P E McEvoy, King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1914 (c).Badges1991-08-231
Five buttons worn by SQMS P E McEvoy, King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1914 (c).Badges1991-08-230
Collar badge, other ranks', King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1911-1924 (c).Badges1985-06-69
Cap badge, other ranks', King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1910 (c).Badges1985-08-42
Photograph of King Edward's Horse Association Lunch, Jun 1962.Photographs1963-09-108
Uniform and equipment items, King Edward's Horse (The King's Oversea Dominions Regiments), worn by SQNQMS P E McEvoy, 1913 (c)-1918 (c).Uniforms1991-08-224



Eleven uniform and equipment items, King Edward's Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), worn by Major Sir Ralph Furse, 1913 (c).Uniforms1958-07-79






Nine uniform and equipment items, King Edward's Horse (The King's Oversea Dominions Regiment), 1905-1919.Equipment, uniform1959-07-97
Cap badge, King Edward's Horse, 1916.Badges1955-03-254
Shoulder titles, King Edward's Horse, 1916.Badges1955-03-309
Shoulder titles, King Edward's Horse, 1916.Badges1955-03-310
Pair of shoulder chains, officers', 2nd King Edward's Horse, worn by 2/Lt R B Thompson, 1900 (c).
(Author's note - these are either King Edward's Horse or the date is 1914-17).
Uniforms1991-04-35
Mess jacket, Majors', King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), worn by Lt Col L James, 1910 (c).Uniforms1960-04-93
All ranks' shoulder title, 2nd King Edward's Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1914-1917.Badges1985-10-112
Forage cap, three jackets, buttons and pair of collar badges, King Edward's Horse, worn by Crosbie Alfred Norman Garstin, nd.Uniforms1961-08-79
Officer's sword associated with King Edward's Horse, belonged to Col Lionel James, nd; with leather scabbard, sword knot and steel scabbard.Edged Weapons1960-05-47
Cavalry sword, other ranks, associated with King Edward's Horse (King's Overseas Dominions Regiment), 1912 (c)-1918 (c); hilt stamped '12.1912 D1G', with label, 'Presented by Lady Brake, MBE, to the Memory of her Husband, Sir Francis Brake ... K.E.H., in the 1914-18 War'; associated with World War One (1914-1918).Edged Weapons1960-11-156
Cap badge, other ranks', 2nd King Edward's Horse, 1914.Badges1959-04-253
Twenty badge items, King Edward's Horse, nd; contained in a frame.Badges1959-07-98
King Edward's Horse / The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment Special Reserve. Colonel in Chief His Majesty the King. Coloured chromolithograph after Hassall, 1908 (c).Prints1959-07-99


The majority of the badges tabulated above are noted within this website. The R. C. Whittock collection of King's Colonials badges are held by the National Army Museum (see Figure 109 under Badge Manufacture).   I would be delighted to hear from anyone if they get an opportunity to visit and obtain clear photographs of any of these items which they could do by arranging to see these objects in advance.  

The Australian War Museum lists a single King Edward’s Horse headdress badge in its collection but it is not available to view on-line. The badge is actually a Gaunt copy.


2KEH Memorial Plaque


2KEH Memorial Plaque
There is a 1990 photograph taken by Colin McIntyre of a memorial plaque to the 2nd King Edward's Horse that was on the wall at the New Zealand High Commission in Haymarket, London.  In subsequent renovations to the building the plaque was lost.

Regimental Silver


Regimental Silver
The Regimental silver of the King’s Colonials and later King Edward’s Horse was donated for custodial safe-keeping and display on special occasions to the Haileybury and Imperial Service College in the UK.  

The items held are:

•           King’s Colonials Bowl
•           Challenge Cup for Posts and Heads
•           Cup presented to the Asian Squadron by Colonel H. Fortescue
•           Hotchkiss Rifle Competition Cup
•           Reconnaissance Challenge Cup
•           Musketry Field Firing Challenge Cup
•           Table Candelabrum
•           Cape Town Challenge Cup
•           Officer’s Mess Cup – Wrestling on Horseback.

The school also has the Dewar Shield and the Australia Shield.  A large painted wood representation of the King Edward’s Horse headdress is on display in the School and is shown in Figure 414.

Figure 414:  A large painted wood representation of the King Edward’s Horse headdress badge at the Haileybury and Imperial Service College (Darren O’Brien collection). 

Vieille Chapelle KEH Memorial


There is a monument to the King Edward's Horse at Vieille Chapelle which is a small village located to the north-east of Bethune in northern France.  The King Edward's Horse defended the village on the 9-11th April 1918.  In 1921, the Mayor of Vielle Chapelle suggested that a memorial stone be placed in a prominent position in the village recording the valiant action of King Edward’s Horse and those that fell there.  The monument was subsequently moved to the village cemetery (Vieille-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, Lacouture) where it stands today.
 
Figures 415-416: Memorial stone honouring those men of the King Edward’s Horse who were killed or wounded at Vieille Chapelle on the 9th-11th April 1918 (Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James. The History of King Edwards Horse (The King's Overseas Dominions Regiment). London: Sifton, Praed & Co, 1921). 

The King Edward's Horse memorial as it looks today in the communal cemetery at Vieille Chapelle.  The name of Lieutenant George Henry Havelock-Sutton MC was added to the rear of the memorial after it had been officially opened in 1921.  He died of wounds received in the action.

Figure 417: The King Edward's Horse memorial in 2018 (Pierre Vanvervelden collection). 

Nominal Rolls & Medal Entitlements


Nominal Rolls & Medal Entitlements
The following pages attempt to record photographs and the medal entitlements of members of the King's Colonials, King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse.  This information is drawn from my own research and from records of auction and dealers sales etc.  To date I have not researched the Medal Index Cards (MIC) of the King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse.  I would be pleased to hear from descendants and family historians with any information regarding individuals who served in these regiments.

Peter Nemaric's excellent website kingedwardshorse.net provides a tremendous biographical resource regarding individuals who served in King Edward's Horse and as a very useful search function.  As I understand it the information was largely drawn from notes in the Old Comrades Association and I recommend it to those researching members of this regiment.  The information I present on the following pages hopefully compliments this.

King's Colonials Medals and Memorials


FEGAN, Daniel. Regimental Sergeant Major Daniel Fegan (Regimental number 274) in Full Dress uniform of ‘B’ Squadron, King Edward’s Horse circa 1911.  (Copyright Imperial War Museum Q 69197).   Regimental Sergeant Major Fegan was born in 1851 in Ireland and saw service with the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards, the King’s Colonials and then King Edward’s Horse.  He saw out the final years in service as a Yeoman of the Guard.

Medals worn by Regimental Sergeant Major Daniel Fegan with a set of miniatures: the 1902 and 1911 Coronation medals; Egypt medal with ‘Tel-el-Kebir’ bar, Khedives Star; Army Long Service and Good Conduct medal; Army Meritorious Service Medal and the Territorial Force Efficiency medal (Reproduced courtesy of Richard Winterton Auctioneers Ltd, UK).

McGOWAN, John. Medals worn by Squadron Sergeant-Major McGowan (Regimental number 2139) 4th Dragoon Guards, King's Colonials and later Yeoman of the Guard. India General Service medal 1895-1902 with two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (S.Q.M.S. J. McGowan, 4th Dragoon Gds); Army Long Service and Good Conduct medal (L.S & G.C. VR., small letter reverse VR crown; Meritorious Service Medal GVR; Khedive's Star 1882.

John McGowan was born in Liverpool and enlisted in the 4th Dragoon Guards on 21 September 1877. After a distinguished service career with the 4th Dragoon Guards, he was posted to the Permanent Staff Yeomanry Cavalry as Regimental Sergeant-Major on 20 December 1901 sanctioned o raise the King's Colonials. He was discharged from the King's Colonials on 12 May 1909 and appointed to Her Majesty's bodyguard on 18 June 1909. He attended the Coronation in 1911, the Silver Jubilee in 1935 and the Coronation in 1937. He died on 11 January 1942.


King's Colonials Medals cont.


King's Colonials Medals cont.
THOMSON, Kenneth Sinclair.  New Zealand. Lieutenant. Transferred to 21st Prince Albert Victor's Own Cavalry (Daly's Horse), Frontier Force. Kenneth Thomson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Sinclair Thomson, of The Crossing, Geraldine, New Zealand.  Was born in Wellington on October 7th, 1886. He entered Wanganui Collegiate School in 1900, and remained there for five years, being a Prefect during his last year. From Wanganui he went for about a year to the Otago Medical School, and thence to St. John’s College, Cambridge. While at Cambridge he obtained a commission in the King’s Colonials and became so much interested in military matters that he decided to give up his medical career and go into the army. After taking his B.A. degree with honours in 1909, he obtained a commission in the Indian Army, leaving in February to join the 21st Cavalry, Frontier Force. He was on leave in New Zealand for six months in 1913 and visited Wanganui. His death in action occurred in the neighbourhood of Basra, in the Persian Gulf, on March 3rd, 1915, he had been attached for service to the 16th Cavalry and put in command of a machine-gun section. He can have only been a very short time at the front before he fell. (In Memoriam, 1914-1918, Wanganui Collegiate School). He is buried in Basra War Cemetery, Iraq (III.C.17). (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).  Photograph is of him in the uniform of a Lieutenant in the 21st Prince Albert Victor's Own Cavalry (Daly's Horse) circa 1914-15.

King's Colonials Officer's Nominal Rolls 1902, 1905 & 1910


King's Colonials Officer's Nominal Rolls 1902, 1905 & 1910
The Officer's of the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry from left to right, back row: Lieutenant Lionel James, Captain J. Howard, Lieutenant P. Hare and Surgeon-Lieutenant L. J. H Oldmeadow, MD.  Second row: Second Lieutenant H. C. Corlette, Colonel Sir E. W. D. Ward (K.C.H Under-Secretary of State for War), Lieutenant G. Hamilton, Captain Sir Robert Baillie, Bart., Lieutenant A. G. Berry, Second Lieutenant W. J. Ratcliffe, Lieutenant Hamar Greenwood, and Lieutenant G. Seymour Fort. Front row: Major J. M. Vereker, Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Wallace, and Captain and Adjutant Robert Roland Thompson in Undress uniform circa 1902 (Navy and Army Illustrated. London: Elliot & Fry, Volume XIV: Number 274, 147-148, May 3rd 1902). Lieutenant later Sir Hamar Greenwood was born in Canada in 1870 and notably served as the last Chief Secretary of Ireland between 1920 and 1922.  He died a Viscount in 1948 and a close-up photograph of him is shown in Figure 156.

Officer's Nominal Roll - 1902

Lieutenant Colonel N. Willoughby Wallace

Major J. M. Vereker

Captains Sir Robert A. Baillie, Bart.
J. Howard
R. S. Vaile

Lieutenants G. Hamilton
A. G. Berry
P. R Hare
Lionel James
Hamar Greenwood
G. S. Fort

2nd Lieutenants H. C. Corlette
W. T. Radcliffe

Adjutant Captain R. R. Thompson

Quarter-Master Lieutenant E. C. Hides

Medical Officers Surgeon Lieutenant L. J. Oldmeadow, M.D.

Surgeon Lieutenant Charters J. Symonds, M.D.

Chaplains Reverend Canon C. H. Wallace
Reverend A. Hunns, M.A., D.C.L.

Regimental Sergeant-Major J. T. McGowan


Officer's Nominal Roll - 1905

Lieutenant Colonel Colonel Honourable H. A. Lawrence

Senior Major Colonel H. Fortescue

Majors J. M. Vereker
J. Howard
Sir Robert A. Baillie, Bart.

Captains R. S. Vaile
G. Hamilton
P. R Hare
Lionel James
Hamar Greenwood
G. S. Fort

Lieutenant H. C. Corlette

2nd Lieutenants C. F. Stockwell
L. W. Just
R. G. Finlay
J. Armstrong
C. H. Hill
W. C. Robinson
R. M. Chirnside
A. F. Wilding

Adjutant Captain G. H. Earle (6th Dragoons)

Quarter-Master Captain W. Kennedy

Medical Officer Surgeon Lieutenant Charters J. Symonds, M.D.

Chaplain Reverend A. Hunns, M.A., D.C.L.

Regimental Sergeant-Major J. T. McGowan


Officer's Nominal Roll - 1910

Lieutenant Colonel Colonel H. Fortescue

Senior Major Lieutenant Colonel V. S. Sandeman

Majors J. Howard
G. Hamilton
Lionel James

Captains Hamar Greenwood
H. C. Corlette
W. B. Pearch

Lieutenants R. G. Finlay
W. C. Robinson
M. F. Dick
P. O. H. Jones
J. A. McDonald

2nd Lieutenants W. P. C. Greene
H. F. Creswick
A. G. Cameron
G. G. Russell
F. P. Day
J. N. MacDonald
R. D. Furse
A. J. Gibson
R. G. Waddy
M. G. D. Murray
C. A. Shaw

Adjutant Captain R. A. Coote (17th Lancers)

Quarter-Master Major W. Kennedy

Medical Officers Surgeon Captain W. Saville Henderson, M.D.
Surgeon Lieutenant Donald J. Armour, F.R.C.S.

Veterinary Officer Lieutenant R. F. Wall

Chaplain Reverend A. Hunns, M.A., D.C.L.

Regimental Sergeant-Major E. S. Wells.


Australians & New Zealanders who served in the King's Colonials/King Edward's Horse


Australians & New Zealanders who served in the King's Colonials/King Edward's Horse


Image of an unknown Australian serving in the Australian Squadron - photograph courtesy of the Upway Museum, Victoria.  


ABBOTT, Bertie. Trooper
ARCHIBALD, William R. 1064, Trooper.

BALE, F. J. Trooper.
BENNETT, Walter. Trooper.
BERCOVITZ, Solomon. 1104, Trooper.
BLACK, J. G. Trooper.
BOILEAU, Gilbert. 1075, Corporal.
BOWKER, Johnnathan R. S. Trooper.
BROOKMAN, Charles J. 498, Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant.
BUCKLAND, Godfrey John. 583, Trooper.
BUCKNELL, William Wentworth. 537, Trooper.
BULL, George. 1603, Trooper.
BUTLER, Geoffrey Travers. Trooper

CAMERON, Donald Keith. Captain.
CHURCHHOUSE, Reginald R. 995, Second Lieutenant.
COOKE, Ewing Edward 1580, Trooper.
CORLETTE, Hubert Christian. Major.
CRESWICK, Harry F. Captain.

DAVIDSON, Douglas. 640, Trooper.
DAWSON, Oswald. 1106 Corporal.
DAWSON, Overend William James. 1668, Trooper.
DAWSON, Robert D. 1526, Corporal.
DEARLOVE, John G. 1017, Corporal.
DRYSDALE, Cluny L. 1206, Trooper.
DUNSTAN, J. L. Trooper.

ELLIOTT, G. M. Trooper.
EVANS, Rupert. Trooper.

FIELDING, Morris Glanville. 201, Corporal.
FITZHERBERT, John A. 326, Trooper.
FRANCIS, Ernest William (Jim). 529, Lieutenant.
FRASER, John N. Trooper
FULLER, Charles S. Lieutenant

GARDINER, Jack D. G. (Puss). 1323, Trooper
GREEN, Roland. Trooper
GREGORY, Warwick E. C. Trooper

HADDIN
, John Stanley (Jack). 1224, Sergeant
HAGGER, Robert Lawrence. Trooper
HAM, Frank Livingstone. Second Lieutenant
HARRIS, Hubert Lacell. 133, Trooper
HARVEY, W.C.P. Lieutenant
HAWKINS, Thomas. 1219, Trooper
HELLMAN, Arthur L. 1936, Trooper
HESP, George. Trooper
HOPE, Roland Wallace. 1048, Trooper

JONES, Robert W. 1888, Trooper.
JONES, Wilfred. 1560, Trooper.
JUDD, William M. 1261, Trooper.

KEYS, John Hunt KEYS. 1602, Trooper
KIBBLE, Sydney George. 1228, Sergeant Major.

LADE, Allan Wettenhall. 710, Lieutenant.
LADE, John Harvey (Sam). 711, Trooper.
LAMB, Harold Benjamin. 22, Squadron Sergeant Major.
LAVERS, H. H. 6, Lance Corporal.
LEAKE, Edward. 1220, Sergeant. Known as Ned,
LEAKE, Leslie. 1221, Sergeant.
LOWE, Rupert. 1943, Trooper.
LUCAS, F. J. 648, Lance Corporal

MACBEAN, Ian B. 121, Sergeant
MACDONALD, John Norman. Major
MACINTOSH, E. Trooper
MACKINNON, Donald N. Captain
MARTIN, Cecil Charles. 1725, Trooper.
MAXWELL, A. 2057, Trooper.
MCARTHY, J. E. Trooper.
MCCRACKEN, Edward. 1105, Sergeant.
MCCULLOCH, William B. (Wally). 1047, Lieutenant.
MCINTOSH, Alexander J. 1046, Lieutenant.
MCKINNON, Donald.
MCLAY, James. 1499, Trooper.
MOFFAT, Leslie Palmer. Lieutenant.
MONTGOMERY, John M. L. 1049, Trooper.
MOORE, Albert W. 1091, Sergeant.
MURRAY, Eric M. 966, Trooper.
MURTON, Herbert Murray 1093, Trooper.

NOTT, Edward Ross. Trooper.

OHALLORAN-GILES, Hew. Lieutenant.

PEEL, A. R. (John). Trooper.
PRIESTLEY, Charles. 1095, Trooper.

RANDERS, Harold K. 1722, Trooper.

SADLIER, John R. 1102, Trooper.
SAILL, Edward C. 935, Second Lieutenant.
SAYER, William Thomas. Trooper.
SLY, Alec F. 873, Trooper.
SMITH, John. 1397, Trooper.
STEWART, W. M. Trooper.
STRETCH, Samuel. 1218, Trooper.
SULLIVAN, Kevin I. 1216, Corporal.
SYME, Allan D. Lieutenant.

TEARE, J. S. Trooper.
THOMAS, D. L. 1280, Trooper.
TOOGOOD, Percy William. 653, Trooper.
TWOPENNY, Richard Ernest Noel. Lieutenant, MC and Bar

New Zealanders who served in the King's Colonials and/or King Edward's Horse

ABRAHAM, Lionel Martyn. Sergeant. Born 6 July 1893 and died 1987. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ADAMS, Noel Percy. Captain. Transferred to New Zealand Field Artillery. Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) on 4 June 1917. Barrister in civilian life. Promoted to Colonel and became Commandant of the Military Training Camp at Featherston, Wairarapa, New Zealand during the First World War. See image (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ARTHUR, Beckham. 111, Sergeant.

BAKER, R. H. Trooper.
BANKS, Donald William. 2134, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
BARRY, A. V. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
BAXTER, Gordon Eyre. 929, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
BELL, Chevoit W. D. Sergeant.
BELL, William Henry Dillon. Captain. Lived at 47 Molesworth Street, Wellington, New Zealand. The son of New Zealand Prime Minister Hon. Sir Francis Bell, G.C.M.G., and Lady Bell. Captain Bell was the first Member of Parliament to go on active service in WWI. Killed in Action 31 July 1917 when shot by a sniper at Ferdinand farm. Mentioned in Despatches. (Reference – Auckland Online Cenotaph, Name recorded on the Menin Gate memorial).
BLACK, Ralph W. 1070, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
BRENNAN. Sergeant.
BRIDGEMAN, Robert J. 1335, Trooper.
BRISTED, Geoffrey Thornborrow. Lance Corporal. Mentioned in Despatches. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
BROMFIELD, Sydney Lewis. 62, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

CHENNELLS, C. H. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
CHING, W. T. Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
COOPER, Henry Mark Hugh. Lieutenant. Died of Wounds. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

DARREL, Richard Frederick William. 1051, Sergeant. Known as Dick. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
DENNISTON, John Geoffrey. 221, Sergeant.
DONALD, Walter Alan. Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
DRUBE, Frederick Peter. 524, Lance Corporal. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

EARLE, Robert Charles 1319, Trooper. Known as Bob. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ELY, P. A. Lieutenant

FEARNLEY, Ernest Walter. 1504, Trooper. Killed in Action. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
FEARNLEY, William George. 1503, Trooper. Killed in Action. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

GRACIE, T. S. Trooper. Transferred to East Lancashire Regiment. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
GRAY, Ronald. Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

HANDFORD, J. R. Second Lieutenant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HANNAY, James. 578, Lieutenant, Awarded Military Cross. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HARRISON, Charles Fancourt. Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HAYTER, Frank Goodenough. 607, Trooper. Transferred to the Manchester Regiment. Promoted to Second Lieutenant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HELLABY, R. S. Trooper. Known as Fred. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HELLABY, John. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Field Artillery. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HERAPATH, Basil Alexander Conrad. 371, Sergeant and promoted to Lieutenant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HINDLE, Harold Burn. 332, Trooper. "Educated here until 1912 and afterwards at Cambridge, was in camp with King Edward's Horse when war broke out. He was given a commission in the Royal Field Artillery (RFA) as early as December, 1914, and went over to France two months later. The following September he was wounded at Loos, but returned to France, after six months, with a howitzer brigade. He subsequently received two appointments as officer orderly, and in October went to England on short leave. His health giving way he was unable to get back, and during March of last year was appointed instructor in a cadet school at Bournemouth. In six months time the school closed and he re-joined the R.F.A., being appointed Staff-Captain on Christmas Day, 1917. Returning in February, he stayed in the firing line until he was killed on March 29th, 1918 (with G Battery Royal Horse Artillery). He was in the School XV. for three years in succession." (In Memoriam, 1914-1918 [Wanganui Collegiate School]). The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website gives Hindle's date of death as 27 March 1918. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph). Image.
HINDLESMITH, Arthur. 563, Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
HINDLESMITH, H. B. 332, Sergeant.
HOBBS, Charles. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Field Artillery.

IZARD, Theodore Arthur. Second Lieutenant. Transferred to Machine Gun Corps and promoted to Lieutenant. Known as Pongo. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
JACOB, A. C. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Horse Artillery. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
JEFFERY, Sidney William, 1831, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
JONES, F. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

KINDER, Thomas Harry. Trooper. A son of Mr Harry Kinder who lived in Arney Road in Remuera, Thomas had his secondary education at Wanganui Collegiate where he served as head prefect in his last year. He then went to study at Caius College in Cambridge. When war was declared, he signed up with King Edwards Horse and transferred to the 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment and went to France. He was killed in action at the Somme on the 3 July 1916. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, Authuile, Somme, France and by a memorial plaque, St Mark’s Anglican Church, 95 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
KRO(U)GH, Henry Charles. 1377, Sergeant. Awarded the Military Medal. Nickname – Shorty. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

LIGHTBOUND, Austin. 9, Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

MACONNELL, Connal. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
MACDONALD, R. Trooper.
McCOMB, William Collingwood. 806, Trooper. Known as Will. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
McCORMACK, Percy James. 1278, Corporal. Also known as Percy James McCallum. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
McKEAN, Archie. 384, Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
MCLEAN, F. S. (Frank). Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
MCLEAN, John A. 780, Trooper.
MUIR, James McLean. 287, Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

NATHAN, M. L. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
NICOL, G. M. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
NORTHCOTE, Tom Francis. 324, Sergeant transferred to Royal Flying Corps and promoted to Lieutenant. Mentioned in Despatches. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
PAIN, K. W. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
PHILLIPS, Ernest Ivor. 238, Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
PINCKNEY, John William. 505, Trooper. Promoted to Lieutenant. Known as Jack. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
PYE, Allan. 1154, Trooper.

RIDGEWAY, William Kemp. 1593, Lance Corporal. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ROBERTON, James Basil Wilkie. Signal Officer. Born 29 January 1896 at Wright St-Clair, Auckland, New Zealand. Saw service with the Northumberland Fusiliers. Awarded Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) in 1919. A doctor in civilian life he served as a Major in World War 2 attached to the Headquarters of the New Zealand Medical Corps, Nom. Roll 12, p.164 Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force, Service Number 462018. Died aged 99 on January 1996 at Te Awamutu, Waikato. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ROGERS, Harry William. 1440, Lance Corporal. Killed in action. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
ROSS, Outram. 703, Corporal.
RUSSELL, George Gray. Major. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. Awarded Companion of the Distinguished Service Order on 4 February 1918 and Mentioned in Despatches three times. A solicitor in civilian life. Attended Wanganui Collegiate School and the University of Cambridge.

SAUNDERS, Ernest Valdrent. 1265, Lance Corporal. Awarded Croix de Guerre (Belgium).
SHENNAN, Watson Douglas. 508, Trooper. Promoted to Lance Corporal and awarded Military Cross (would be the Military Medal as an NCO). (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
SHERMAN, W. D. Trooper. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
SMEETON, Warwick J. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Field Artillery. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
STEWART, John Francis. 1376, Lance Corporal. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
SUNDERLAND, Geoffrey. 509, Trooper. Transferred to Royal Sussex Regiment, promoted to Sergeant and Killed in Action. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

WATSON, W. E. Sergeant. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
WILLIAMS, Samuel R. 184, Trooper. Known as Sam. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
WILLIAMS, Selwyn Coldham. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Field Artillery, 189th Brigade, C Battery and promoted to Lieutenant. "At School here from the beginning of 1906, left with a number of others in May 1912, to go to Cambridge. While there he joined King Edward's Horse, and being liable for service abroad, expected to be called upon immediately the war broke out. With others, however, he was given a commission in the R.F.A., and for a time did special work at Home before going to France. He saw active service near Armentieres, in September 1915, but was invalided home again in the following January. Returning in April to the Somme front, he was associated with the New Zealanders in the attack on Fleurs, where, on his senior officer being wounded, he took command of his battery, and was recommenced [sic] for a decoration, which was never granted. His unit was later moved to some other part of the front, where he was killed on January 18th, 1917." (In Memoriam, 1914-1918 [Wanganui Collegiate School]). He is buried in Klein-Vierstraat British Cemetery, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (I.A.17). (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).
WILSON, Reginald. 456, Trooper.

YOUNGHUSBAND, Leigh Norman. Trooper. Transferred to Royal Field Artillery and promoted to Major. Mentioned in Despatches. (Reference - Auckland Online Cenotaph).

King Edward's Horse Officer's Nominal Roll - August 1914 & 1919


King Edward's Horse Officer's Nominal Roll   -  August 1914 & 1919
Image of Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James DSO, circa 1919.

1914

Lieutenant-Colonel  Lieutenant Colonel V. S. Sandeman

Senior Major Major Lionel James

Majors    E. W. Hermon
                W. B. Pearch
                M. F. Dick
                H. C. Corlette

Captains   N. P. Adams (seconded and joined the New Zealand Forces)
                   G. G. Russell
                   J. M. F. Wilkinson
                   J. N. MacDonald

Lieutenants   R. D. Furse
                        R. G. Waddy (seconded)
                        C. A. Shaw  
                        H. Swann
                        B. H. Barber
                        W. C. P. Harvey

2nd Lieutenants      H. F. Creswick (seconded)
                                  A. G. Cameron (seconded)
                                  S. T. Ravenscroft
                                  F. G. Ling
                                  W. D. A. Holland
                                  H. M. H. Cooper
                                  Hon. H. S. Fielding
                                  D. MacKinnon
                                  D. K. Cameron
                                  F. J. Romanes
                                  P. D. Stevenson
                                  C. W. D. Bell
                                  A. G. Finlay
                                  H. F. Buxton
                                  N. G. Addison
                                  H. M. Tulloch
                                  G. H. Havelock-Sutton
                                  T. A. Izard

Adjutant Captain A. B. Reynolds (12th Lancers)

Quarter-Master Major W. Kennedy

Medical Officer Surgeon Captain W. Saville Henderson, M.D.

Chaplain Reverend A. Hunns, M.A., D.C.L.

Regimental Sergeant-Major M. O’Donnell.
 
1919

Lieutenant-Colonel   Lieutenant Colonel Lionel James DSO

Senior Major   Major M. F. Dick

Majors  G. G. Russell DSO
              J. N. MacDonald
              W. B. Pearch
              R. D. Furse DSO
              H. Swann

Captains    B. H. Barber MC
                    H. F. Creswick
                    A. G. Cameron
                    D. MacKinnon

Lieutenants   W. C. P. Harvey (seconded)
                         P. D. Stevenson
                         G. H. Havelock-Sutton MC
                         H. J. Aitchinson
                         T. A. Izard
                         L. C. Ramsey
                         D. A. Syme
                         E. G. Linton MC
                         R. E. N. Twopeny MC
                         T. F. Northcote
                         R. Girvan
                         R. W. Hope
                         N. A. Thomson
                         W. E. Watt AFC
                         A. W. Lade
                         J. Stewart
                          I. R. B. Stein MC
                         C. A. N. Garstin
                         J. C. N. Eastwick
                         V. Rathbone VC
                         J. F. Brackell
                         E. W. Francis
                          I. B. McBean
                          L. P. Moffat MC
                          L. L. Lacey
                          W. B. McCulloch MC
                          J. W. Patell
                          A. J. McIntosh
                         W. E. Gilbert MC
                          E. M. Murray
                          G. H. Matterson
                          E. E. Hyde
                          V. G. Fannin
                          O. S. Grape
                          B. A. C. Herapath
                          W. J. Pretorius
                          A. Y. MCormick
                          T. S. Robertson
                          A. Aagaard

2nd Lieutenants      W. M.Keay
                                   E. R. Ewels
                                   G. M. Meikle
                                   F. R. B. Thompson
                                   T. D. Bell
                                   G. B. Blaker
                                   W. Bolus
                                   C. W. Brownell
                                   R. R. Churchouse
                                   F. L. Cox
                                   R. A. Crompton
                                   J. C. Freeman
                                   W. J. H. Murdoch
                                   H. T. Swain
                                   A. G. Ewing
                                   E. C. Saill
                                   R. D. Alexander
                                   N. H. Campbell
                                   W. M. B. Short
                                   K. L. Hunter
                                   G. E. Robinson
                                   K. W. Armstrong- Lushington-Tulloch

Adjutants Captain G. H. Matterson (Acting)

Captain W. E. H. Bradburn (Reserve Regiment)

Quarter-Masters  Lieutenant J. R. Smith
                               Captain W. Acheson (Reserve Regiment)

Medical Officer Surgeon Captain W. Saville Henderson, M.D.

Chaplain Reverend A. Hunns, M.A., D.C.L.

Regimental Sergeant-Majors  E. E. Bond
                                                     A. Cole (Reserve Regiment).

King Edward's Horse (KEH) Medals or Memorials by SURNAME 'A'


King Edward's Horse (KEH) Medals or Memorials by SURNAME 'A' King Edward's Horse (KEH) Medals or Memorials by SURNAME 'A'
ADAMS, Lionel L. 1433, Private.  Victory medal illustrated. Promoted to Sergeant and transferred to the  Reserve 26 June 1919 (Reference - medals sold on electronic auction site 2014).

AGASS, Alfred. 465025, Private. Born Bethnal Green, London. Enlisted in Walthamstow. Killed in action at age 31 18/08/1915 Belgium.  Name recorded on Menin Gate, Ypres Panel 54.  No known photograph.

ARNOLD, Jack. 991, Private, 'B' Squadron . 1914-15 Star (991 Pte., K. Edw. H.); British War and Victory Medals (991 Pte., K. Edw. H.). Born in South Africa and entered the France/Flanders theatre of war on 15 September 1915 and discharged 9th July 1919.  Medals sold with a copy of the Medal Index Card (Dixon Noonan Webb auctioneers, UK, 2014).

KEH 'B'


KEH 'B' KEH 'B'
BAYLEY, Lewis S. Private, 513, ? Squadron.   British War Medal - 513 PTE. L. S. BAYLEY. K. EDW. H. and Victory Medal - 513 PTE. L. S. BAYLEY. K. EDW. H. shown with a copy of the Medal Index Card.  The 1915 Star was noted as missing. Arrived in France 23 August 1915 and discharged 8 August 1919 (Reference - sold in 2014 on an electronic auction site, UK).

BOLUS, Walter.  1481, 2nd Lieutenant.  According to the family, Walter Bolus traveled from the Transvaal in South Africa to enlist. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in King Edward's Horse 22 February 1918. As a farm boy from the Transvaal he'd mucked about on horses all his life, but he found the training pretty grueling.  A descendant tells of how he used to imitate the sarcastic tone of the NCO's saying " Did you say you could ride, Mr Bolus"!  He won a number of Irish War Hospital horse jumping competitions whilst training at the Curragh. The family have the cup that he won and also his stirrups.  Later he was deployed to France. Thanks to the family for the information.  The photograph of him as a 2nd Lieutenant is from the Old Comrades Association Bulletin.

KEH 'C'


CHAPPELL, Cyril Thomas.  1946, Corporal.  Born in Dunstable, Bedfordshire and died of wounds on the Western Front 11 March 1918.  Buried in St Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France.  Memorial plaque sold at auction February 2019.

COLLINS, Victor Leon Monier. 1308, Lance Corporal. Killed in Action in France 09/04/1918. Son of F. A. Collins, Deputy Registrar of the Courts, Trinidad. Born 25 Sep 1896, at Port of Spain. Educated Queens Royal College, Port of Spain, Trinidad. Sailed with the First Merchants Contingent on 18 Oct 1915. (Reference: Commonwealth War Dead Grave Memorial Reference: XVII. B. 19. Cemetery: CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, France). Commemorated on Port of Spain Cenotaph.

CUTLER, Thomas.  Private, 1672, 'B' Squadron.  Killed in Action  9 April 1918 in defense of Vieille Chapelle, Huits Maisons and Fosse Bridgeheads. Aged 23. Born in Weybridge in 1895.  Youngest son of Mrs Annie Cutler, 2 Yew Cottages, Military Road, Dover. Name recorded on the Dover War Memorial. (Reference - Lionel James: The History of King Edward's Horse (The King's Oversea Dominions Regiment). Sifton, Praed, 1921. (Gravestone photograph courtesy of Pierre Vandervelden).

KEH 'D'


KEH 'D'
DORMAN, James. 1558, Sergeant.  British War Medal and Victory Medal and King Edward's Horse gilding metal headdress badge in an oak frame.  Arrived in France 11 July 1915 and transferred to the Reserve 24 July 1919 (Photograph courtesy of Margaret Gledhill).

KEH 'E'


KEH 'E' KEH 'E'

EATON, Roland Wynne. 441, Private.  Roland Wynne Eaton served in France from 1st June 1915. He started his service as a Private in King Edward's Horse and was commissioned into the Royal Garrison Artillery as a 2nd Lieutenant on 6 July 1916. Address given as 41 North John Street, Liverpool.  Military Cross engraved to Lieutenant R. W. Eaton announced in the London Gazette 01.01.1919.  Died 29 December 1957.  (Reference - Dixons Medals, dixonmedals.co.uk, 2018).

EDWARDS, H. 779, Corporal.  Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, 2 clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (7618 Private., Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.); 1914-15 Star (779 Private., King Edward's Horse); British War and Victory Medals (779 Cpl., King Edward's Horse) (Reference - Dixon Noonan Webb Auctioneers, UK, 2015).

KEH 'F'


KEH 'F'
FORREST, H. A. 940, Private. 1914-15 Star (940 Pte. H. A. Forrest. K. Edw. H.); British War and Victory Medals (940 Pte. H. A. Forrest. K. Edw. H.). Harold Archibald Forrest was born in Streatham in 1889 and attested for General Service on 4 September 1914, giving his profession as Assistant Riding Master. He served during the Great War with King Edward's Horse on the Western Front from 5 May 1915, and, having subsequently transferred to the 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, was discharged on account of wounds on 9 August 1918 (entitled to Silver War Badge). He died in Rochford, Essex, in 1948. (Reference - Dixon Noonan Webb auctioneers, UK, 2017).


KEH 'G'


KEH 'G' KEH 'G'
GARLAND, Charles (Dick).  Dick was born in Canada and educated at Brighton Grammer School in Victoria, Australia as his father Richard was General Manager of Dunlop Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Australia.  Dick and his brother Ewart were living in London at the outbreak of the war and Dick enlisted in King Edward's Horse in April 1915.   He saw service with the KEH during the Easter uprising in Ireland and wrote a letter that was published in 'The Age' newspaper in Victoria on 1st July 1916 which caused a stir as to the scale of civilian losses during the uprising and the plight of the Irish people. Ewart trained to be a pilot with the Royal Flying Corps in July 1916.  Photograph of Dick Garland in India in 19430 courtesy of the State Library of Queensland http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/ww1/2016/03/28/charles-garland-easter-rising-1916/.

GROSVENOR, G. Honourable Major. Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, 2 clasps, Transvaal, Cape Colony (Lieut: Hon. G. Grosvenor, Rifle Bde.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, 2 clasps (Lt. Hon. G. Grosvenor. Rifle Bde.); 1914-15 Star (Lieut. Hon. G. Grosvenor. K. Edw. H.); British War and Victory Medals (Major Hon. G. Grosvenor).  The Honourable Gilbert Grosvenor was born on 22 August 1881, the second son of the 1st Baron Stalbridge and his wife Eleanor, and the grandson of the 2nd Marquess of Westminster. He was educated at Eton, and was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade, serving with them in South Africa during the Boer War. He transferred to The King's Colonials in 1908, and served with the King Edward’s Horse during the Great War, before transferring in 1916 to the Nottingham Yeomanry (Sherwood Rangers) with the rank of Major.  Grosvenor married Miss Effie Cree, the daughter of the Reverend Edward Cree, on 4 July 1913. He died without issue on 15 June 1939.  (Medal Photograph courtesy of Dixon Noonan Webb auctioneers, 2016, UK).


KEH 'J'


KEH 'J'
JESSOP, Carl Edgar. 600, Private. King Edward's Horse.  Great War medal trio retained by the family.   Enlisted in England, arrived in France 22 April 1915 and was discharged 10 March 1919.  Died November 1952 in Huntington, UK.  (Source - personal correspondence with the family).  

KEH 'K'


KEH 'K'
KIBBLE, Sydney, George. Sergeant Major. 1228. Born in Redfern, New South Wales on 19 May 1876, educated at Hawkesbury Agricultural College and was a grazier at Mt Tambourine in Queensland.  He served as a Private in the 2nd Queensland Mounted Infantry and saw service in the 2nd Boer War having enlisted on 1 January 1900 in Brisbane.  He sailed to South Africa on the 13th January 1900 aboard the S.S. Maori King. He transferred to the Transvaal Mounted Police on the 19th June 1900 and returned to Australia on 3rd May 1901 and was discharged 17th May 1901.  He enlisted in the King Edward's Horse on the 11th August 1915 and was in 1st Section of the 1st Troop, 'C' Squadron in June 1917.  Shot and wounded by a sniper at Pilkem Ridge, Passchendale on 31st July 1917 and discharged on 6th October 1917.   He died of natural causes in Battersea, London in March 1944. Photograph in the uniform of the King Edward's Horse from "The Australasian Traveller" dated 4 March 1916.  Courtesy of the State Library of Queensland and biographical information from the Virtual War Memorial, Sydney https://vwma.org.au/explore/people/786363.

KEH 'L'


KEH 'L' KEH 'L'
LAYLAND, Thomas Dawson. Captain. British War and Victory Medals (Capt.) Born on 14 February 1874. As a Private in King Edward’s Horse he entered France on 4 April 1915. Commissioned into the Dorset Yeomanry on 2 February 1916. Later served as a Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) with the South Lancashire Regiment. Post war he lived in British Columbia (Reference - Dixon Noonan Webb auctioneers, UK, 2015).

LEWIS, Wilfred. 1134, Private.  Died 19 September 1915. Buried in Liverpool Kirkdale cemetery (Photograph courtesy of Tony Brown).

KEH 'M'


KEH 'M'
MEKERLE, A. Private, 757.  1914-15 trio and entitled to Silver War Badge (for those who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in the Great War). Later served with the Machine Gun Corps. Medals for sale in the UK in 2019 (Bill Friar Medals).

KEH 'P'


KEH 'P'
PILE, Arthur Douglas. 1084, Private.  1914-15 Star, War and Victory Medals (1084 Pte. A. D. Pile, K. Edw. H). Arthur Douglas Pile died on the 21st August, 1917 and is buried in the Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery Extension at Leper, West-Vlaanderen, in Belgium (Reference - Woolley and Wallis Auctioneers, UK, 2006).

KEH 'S'


KEH 'S' KEH 'S'
SLADE, A. E. 1626, Private.  1914/15 STAR named to 1626 PTE A. E. SLADE K. EDW. H. To France 15/7/15 with King Edwards Horse; Discharged sick 23/8/16 & entitled to the Silver War Badge.  Sold with supporting documentation. (Reference - greatwarmedals.com, 2018).

SMITH, J. 784, Private.  Arrived in France 21 April 1915 and discharged 12 March 1919 (Photograph courtesy of Richard Winterton Auctioneers, United Kingdom).

2nd King Edward's Horse


2nd King Edward's Horse 2nd King Edward's Horse

BAILLIE,  R. W. Lieutenant.  Highland Light Infantry late 2nd King Edward's Horse.  1914-15 Star (368 Cpl R. W. Baillie 2nd King Edward's Horse)  British War and Victory medals named to Lieut. R. W. Baillie HLI) and Mentioned in Dispatches oak leaves.  


CUTHBERT, Robert (Reggie) Lancelot, 340. Trooper. Killed in Action 7th July 1915, France aged 47. Robert was the son of Anne Wilkinson and the Late Hugh Cuthbert of 49 Cluny Drive, Edinburgh. Robert lived in Singapore and was a member of the Singapore Volunteers before joining 2nd King Edward's Horse (Photograph of Grave Memorial Cross).

WORSLEY-WORSWICK, B. H. Second Lieutenant 2nd King Edward's Horse (Portrait photograph).

Wanted


Wanted
I am missing a number of King's Colonials, King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse headdress and collar badges, shoulder titles and buttons and would be pleased to hear via the contact page if you have spares or variants to swap or sell.  I am also keen to identify additional information, uniforms, medals and medal entitlements, photographs, postcards and other ephemera plus Old Comrades Association bulletins of the King's Colonials, King Edward's Horse and 2nd King Edward's Horse.

Full acknowledgement will be given to all contributors to the website.

Thanks in advance, Dean.

Contact


  • Brisbane Queensland, Australia